Honoring Our Vets

War Veterans have put their life on the line and the saying goes “All gave some and some gave all”.

The quintessential act of giving one’s life for their country is an act of the utmost valor and selflessness.

Although all of us sleep, rise and live under the blanket of freedom provided by such men and women, we have often forgotten them once the guns are holstered and the uniforms are hung in some dusty closet somewhere.

What remains among us are the very men and women who wore those uniforms and shouldered the task of our protection.

In our personal lives, we pass vets daily, some of whom we will never know of their service. My 92 year old father is a WW2 vet, yet never volunteers that information unless asked. Other veterans work among us, or recreate with us, wait tables for us or do the myriad of jobs around us, never asking for anything but what is earned.

Still others hang out in alleys or on street corners, in homeless shelters or mental institutions, much of their plight likely caused by the horror they’ve seen or by the simple fact that they were little more than teens when integrated into the most sophisticated and largest military in the world, both in mechanism and regimen.

For a myriad of reasons, both obvious and others not so obvious, some vets have difficulty in adjusting to societal norms and therefore not living what some might call normal lives.

Some vets are homeless, institutionalized or living on the outer margins of society. At times it may seem the same government that called them into service has now forgotten many of their needs. Luckily we are fortunate to have those who care enough to reach out and try to help in whatever way they can.

“Welcome Home Vets” and the “Stand Down” organizations are two such entities.

Welcome Home Vets provide support and transitional services to vets and their families. This may include mental health therapy, assistance in navigating the various veteran support systems, and increasing public awareness.

The Stand Down Organization’s main focus is helping homeless vets by providing a broad range of basic services and items such as food, clothing, medical, dental, legal help, mental health assistance, job counseling and basic companionship when needed.

The local chapters of both recently held one of their many events to raise funds for providing these support services. The annual Welcome Home Vets motorcycle rally and BBQ was held on September 16, 2017 and the Stand Down event date is October 6th and 7th at the Nevada County Fairgrounds. At this two day event, veterans can access clothes and other basic necessities including medical, dental, 12 step addiction counseling, PTSD counseling and referrals, job counseling and other assistance.

Both entities accept public support and can be contacted through their local chapters found on any web browser or the national websites below:

Welcome Home Vets: Welcomehomevets.org

Stand Down: Standown.org

In conclusion, I attended the Welcome Home Vets BBQ event and early in the day spoke to many of the people who were prepping for the event. I found their dedication and conviction of cause both heartwarming and extremely moving.

This article expresses the opinions of Marc Cuniberti and are opinions only and should not be construed or acted upon as individual investment advice. Mr. Cuniberti is an Investment Advisor Representative through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Marc can be contacted at MKB Financial Services 164 Maple St #1, Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 823-2792. MKB Financial Services and Cambridge are not affiliated. His website is www.moneymanagementradio.com. California Insurance License # OL34249

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