Print
Mar202017

YCWA approves loan to Reclamation District 2103

The Yuba County Water Agency has approved a loan to Reclamation District 2103 for up to $200,000 to help cover the costs of necessary levee repairs on the Bear River.

During the February storms, a critical section of channel bank, located on the north side of the Bear River Levee, approximately a quarter mile east of Highway 65, eroded due to high river flows. YCWA’s loan will cover 90 percent of the repair work, completed several weeks ago.

“One of YCWA’s fundamental missions is to improve public safety for the people of Yuba County,” said YCWA Board Chairman Brent Hastey. “We work closely with the local Reclamation Districts to ensure the integrity of the levees to reduce our local flood risk.”

RD 2103 oversees 9.8 miles of levee and is responsible for the maintenance and operation of the Dry Creek levee, Bear River levee and the San Joaquin drainage canal, which provide protection to the City of Wheatland and surrounding agricultural lands.

“RD 2103 closely monitors levees during high water events,” said Tom Engler, RD 2103 district engineer. “With limited financial resources it is really helpful to have a funding partner like YCWA to help us respond to these critical areas before they get worse or cause significant damage.”

44 truckloads of crushed rock were delivered to shore up the banks from continued erosion, but further damage occurred on the levee roads as a result of the heavy trucks used to assist in the repair efforts.

YCWA’s loan will cover 90 percent of the total costs for the project – approximately $60,000 for the initial erosion work, $48,000 to re-rock the damaged road and hydro-seed for additional erosion protection, and approximately $80,000 for post-project environmental permitting and potential mitigation. Initial erosion repair work was completed under emergency authority on Feb. 15, and the road repairs and hydro-seeding were completed March 3 during a break in the stormy weather.

RD 2103 has submitted for reimbursement through the California Office of Emergency Services, and is continuing to pursue state and federal funding to offset the costs.