Yuba City, Ca.

 

Karm Bains outdoor smileCounty Board of Education member, community leader and local farmer Karm Bains pulled papers in the final step to become a candidate for Sutter County Supervisor in District 4.

 

“I don’t need another job, and I am not shopping for political office,” said Bains. “This is about serving the community. Service is part of my DNA, it’s how I was raised.”

 

As Supervisor, Bains said he will focus on reducing homelessness, attracting jobs and businesses to the region, repairing and improving roads, supporting public safety, and ensuring disaster preparedness.

 

“The homeless problem gets worse every day,” said Bains, “and while we need help with a path out of homelessness, we also have to reduce the impact the homeless are having on our neighborhoods, businesses, and water ways.”

 

Bains announced that he had earned the endorsements of Congress Members John Garamendi and Doug La Malfa.

 

“I’m proud to have earned the trust and support of Congressman La Malfa and Congressman Garamendi, along with dozens of local leaders who are supporting my campaign,” said Bains.  “I will be working hard to honor their confidence.”

Water supply reliability, flood risk reduction projects, new emergency response equipment

Marysville, Ca

 

 Three local agencies received a financial boost today with the help of Yuba Water Agency. 

 

Olivehurst Public Utility District steel water main project - $1.4 million

 

A $1.4 million grant provides funding to help OPUD replace the steel water main it uses to deliver water to approximately 10,000 residents in the disadvantaged community of Olivehurst. 

 

The current steel water main has been in service well past its life expectancy and is prone to leakage and inefficiencies, which leads to the loss of approximately 78 million gallons of water each year. 

 

“Replacing this outdated infrastructure is essential to improving efficiency and maintaining a reliable water supply for the residents in Olivehurst,” said Yuba Water Agency Director Doug Lofton, whose district includes Olivehurst. 

OPUD will replace approximately 14,000 feet of the aging steel water main with 8-inch-diameter PVC pipe. The district will also replace 25 fire hydrants, 69 8-inch valves and 40 tie-in locations to the existing water main lines. 

This is one of several projects that are being presented to the Department of Water Resources to compete for $24 million in funding for various water projects that benefit disadvantaged communities. That includes water supply and flood risk reduction projects for Yuba County, Reclamation District 784, Linda County Water District, and the cities of Wheatland and Marysville, and the local contribution from Yuba Water makes the entire group of projects more competitive for the larger grant. 

 

Yuba Water is able to grant these funds to OPUD because this project will help conserve water, and ensuring a sustainable water supply is a primary agency mission.

 

Three Rivers Levee Improvement Authority Hallwood flood risk project - $500,000 

 

Yuba Water Agency also approved a grant for the Three Rivers Levee Improvement Authority to help reduce the flood risk for the community of Hallwood. 

 

The $500,000 in funding will be used by TRLIA to continue its efforts to strengthen the Yuba River North Training Wall.

 

“We’re happy to expand TRLIA’s reach to take the lead on this important flood risk reduction project,” said TRLIA Executive Director Paul Brunner. “Yuba Water Agency funding will be used for preliminary engineering, design and environmental work, which is an important first step in project implementation.” 

 

Originally, the purpose of the Yuba River North Training Wall was to confine, or train, the boundaries of the Yuba River to manage mining debris. However, during the high-water events in 2017 and 2018, Hallwood experienced localized shallow flooding due to erosion of the training wall. A temporary fix was constructed last year, and this funding will begin the process to find a long-term solution. 

 

Yuba Water Agency’s grant to Three Rivers is part of the agency’s long-standing mission to reduce flood risk for Yuba County. In prior years, Yuba Water has assisted TRLIA with policy, technical and financial aid, including carrying the local cost-share for the construction of the Feather River Setback Levee. Yuba Water is repaying $5.5 million per year for that project. 

 

Reducing flood risk is one of the primary reasons Yuba Water was formed.

 

Marysville Police Department emergency response vehicle and trailer - $10,000

 

This grant will fund an all-terrain vehicle and an all-terrain vehicle rescue trailer for the Marysville Police Department as part of Yuba Water Agency’s Bill Shaw Rescue Equipment and Training Grant program. 

 

The new ATV will be used to quickly and effectively respond to people trapped in the river bottoms due to rising water levels, and the trailer will allow officers to stabilize people experiencing medical issues during those incidents.

The Bill Shaw Rescue Equipment and Training Grant Program, which was created in 2018, is designed for first-responder agencies in Yuba County and will cover the one-time costs of up to $10,000 per applicant annually, associated with the purchase of rescue equipment and specialized personnel training. Since its inception, the program has supported 14 agencies with $178,500 in grants. 

New California State Grievance 95 Reading Sonoma, CA 

Date: November 19, 2019

Time:  Readings Began at 11:00 am

Location:  Sonoma, CA Plaza, Bear Flag Monument 

 

WEBSITE www.newcaliforniastate.com   email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

 

            New California State was formed in 2017 and on January 15, 2018 declared Independence from the state of California following Article IV, Section 3 of the United States Constitution.  

 

 Since declaring Independence from the State of California on January 15, 2019 the New California State movement members have read 94 of 95 Grievances. A single Grievance was read each week for the past 95 weeks as part of the New California State Declaration of Independence “Process”. On November 19, 2019 the “Process”  came to an end with the reading of the 95th Grievance.

 

 In the New California State declaration there are 95 Grievances which list the reasons why New Californians are seeking Independence from the state of California.

 

 A special final reading was  held in Sonoma, CA, which in 1846 was the site of the "Bear Flag Revolt".

 There were readings from 5 documents  during the reading of Grievance 95.

 

 The 1836 Declaration of Independence of Alta California from Mexico https://img1.wsimg.com/blobby/go/720c6a07-3594-44b7-809894fc11bae240/downloads/1c3nogpvf_570332.pdf

 

 The 1846 William B. Ide “Proclamation” Bear Flag Rebellion https://img1.wsimg.com/blobby/go/720c6a07-3594-44b7-809894fc11bae240/downloads/1c3nog006_44435.pdf

 

 The 1863 Gettysburg Address by President Abraham Lincoln. November 19, 2019 is 156 anniversary of the Gettysburg Address.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gettysburg_Address

 

 The 2018 New California State Declaration of Independence https://img1.wsimg.com/blobby/go/720c6a07-3594-44b7-809894fc11bae240/downloads/1c3sut5r6_88440.pdf

 

 The 95th New California State Grievance 

 

 New California is a new state in development exercising it’s Constitutional Right to form from the State of California. The process to form New California is authorized and codified in Article 4 Section 3 of the United States Constitution.

Thursday, November 21, 2019

Doors Open at 6:00 – Meeting starts at 6:30

 

The Yuba Watershed Protection & Fire Safe Council is hosting

an informational meeting.  Nicole Roldan-Leben, with USDA-Rural

Development, will discuss their grant and/or low-interest loan

programs.  Both are designed to help residents pay for home fire-

safe upgrades and to improve their defensible space. 

 

Dr. Kate Wilkin, with UC Extension and an active member of

our Fire Safe Council, will share information on the most important

fire resistant upgrades for your home and treatments for your property,

and what is eligible for this grant/loan program. 

 

In addition, information will be presented regarding a new Fire Safe

Council Defensible Space Advisor Program.  Volunteers will be

trained and available to review your property.  A grant has also been

secured that will pay for the hazard and risk assessments that are

part of creating a Firewise USA Community.

On Thursday, November 14th, the Rural County Representatives of California (RCRC) hosted its third Homeowners’ Insurance Ad Hoc Committee (Committee) meeting.  This meeting was held at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Ventura County.  RCRC member counties have been disproportionally impacted by recent homeowners’ insurance cancellations and non-renewals following years of devastating wildfires in California.  

 

In June, the RCRC Board of Directors approved a resolution creating the Committee.  The Committee is tasked with considering potential solutions for the increase in homeowners’ insurance cancellations and non-renewals in high fire risk areas.  In particular, how county governments can develop programs and measures to encourage greater community-wide access and affordability to homeowners insurance. 

 

The potential solutions include, but are not limited to, introducing additional insurers into rural areas, working with the insurance industry on an insurance risk-reduction model, examining insurance industry risk modeling, re-creating/revising California’s Fair Access to Insurance Requirements Plan (FAIR Plan), and working directly with policy advocates, the California Legislature, and the Department of Insurance to explore other options.

 

The Committee is tasked with issuing a report of findings no later than the August 2020 Board of Directors meeting.

San Francisco, Ca.

 

Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E)  released photos of wind-related damage and hazards that were found during inspections following the October 9 Public Safety Power Shutoff (PSPS). The company is making photos available on its website at www.pge.com/octoberpsps.

 

 The 116 incidents of damage or hazards were spread widely across PG&E’s service territory. Wind gusts exceeded 50 mph in 15 counties throughout PG&E’s service territory, and damage or hazards were found throughout impacted areas. It is possible that these damages and hazards represented potential sources of wildfire ignition.

 

PSPS Damage Hazards Snapshot

Event

# Incidences

Wind Gusts

# Counties Impacted

10/9 PSPS

116

50+ mph

15

 

 The top four wind gusts by county recorded for the October 9 PSPS were:

 

  • 77 MPH: Top wind gust recorded in Sonoma County on Oct. 10 at 4:05 a.m.
  • 75 MPH: Top wind gust recorded in Contra Costa County on Oct. 10 at 3:20 a.m.
  • 61 MPH: Top wind gust recorded in Tehama County on Oct. 10 at 6:27 a.m.
  • 61 MPH: Top wind gust recorded in Tulare County on Oct. 9 at 3:10 p.m.

Yuba/Sutter, Ca.

 

 CHP reported that on Thursday, November 14th at approximately 4:50 p.m., a fatal crash occurred on Pass Road. A teenager was driving a 2019 Honda westbound on Pass Rd east of West Butte Rd. A second driver, Luke Flemming was driving a 2006 Honda eastbound on Pass Rd. east of West Butte Rd. A preliminary investigation indicated that one of the vehicles crossed over into the opposing lane and hit the other vehicle head-on. Both drivers received fatal injuries and were pronounced dead on the scene. A passenger from the first vehicle airlifted to Rideout Hospital for moderate injuries. Alcohol or drug intoxication is not suspected to have contributed to this collision.

Yuba City, Ca

 

bus.lunchAllan Jones photoBusiness Men’s Fellowship USA will hold a special Breakfast Meeting on Saturday, November 16th, 2019, @ 9:00 am at the Plaza Room at Hillcrest Plaza, Yuba City. Enjoy a buffet breakfast for $16.00. Everyone, men and women, are invited to attend.  Special Guest Speaker for the Breakfast will be Allan Jones from Wigan, England.  Allan worked as a research and development Physicist in England developing oil and gas burning techniques and cooling procedures for glass.  Allan also taught Physics and Mathematics.  Coming home one night after a church service, Allan experienced God’s deliverance in what could have been a near tragic road accident.  That encounter dramatically changed the course of his life.  Allan is currently involved in full-time ministry throughout the world sharing his testimony and salvation through Jesus Christ. Allan has traveled to more than 80 countries over 40 plus years! Come and hear Allan’s amazing story!  Come expecting a miracle! Bring a friend!  The Plaza Room is located at 210 Julie Drive, Yuba City. 

 

For more information and to make reservations contact Chris Davis 530-751-7237, or Sue Davis 530-300-6119.

Yuba City, Ca.

 

The Feather River Tea Party Patriots announced Assemblyman James Gallagher will be the Special Guest Speaker for their next meeting, Monday, November 18, 2019.

 

feather river tea James Gallagher 2Assemblyman Gallagher represents the 3rd California Assembly District encompassing parts of the Sacramento Valley.  Prior to being elected to the State Assembly, he was the Sutter County District 5 Supervisor.

 

Assemblyman Gallagher will update the current status of the Paradise Fire reconstruction and the Oroville Dam repairs.   He will also share his views on California sanctuary cities, President Trump’s immigration policies and the invasion at our southern border, the growing local homeless problem, future healthcare in California, and the plethora of anti-Second Amendment laws streaming out of Sacramento.  What impact does the current super-majority in the California legislature have on the citizens of the Sutter-Yuba area?

 

Don’t forget – Our regular feature In The News with Paul Preston, Agenda 21 Radio Host and New California State movement President.  Paul will follow our Special Guest Speaker and will be discussing events of the day.

Everyone is welcome.  There is no membership and no cost to attend.  The Feather River Tea Party Patriots meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. sharp and will be held at Crossroads Community Church, 445 B Street, Yuba City.  Doors open at 6:00 p.m.  Come early to register, socialize with like-minded patriots, and get a good seat. 

 

Contact Larry or Carla for information: (530) 755-4409.

 

Visit our website: https://featherriverteapartypatriots.ning.com/

Sutter County

 

Sutter County Agricultural Commissioner Lisa Herbert announced that the

walnut buying period  began Friday, November 8th, beginning a window period that

will end April 30, 2020, pursuant to the County’s Walnut Theft Prevention ordinance.

 

Rice remains the top-ranking crop in 2018 with a 29% increase in acreage. A slight

decrease in yield was offset by an increase in price pushing the total value to $178.5 million.

Rice was first planted commercially in Sutter County in 1913. In that year 395 acres were

planted in the south east part of the Sutter Basin. In the past 30 years, rice has remained the

number one crop 28 times only yielding the top spot to prunes in 1989 and walnuts in 2014.

 

In second place, walnuts total value decreased 34.1% to $85,956,000 due to a dramatic

drop in price, even though acreage was up considerably. Clingstone peaches rose from fifth

place to third due to increases in acreage, yield and price to a total value of $59,798,000.

Prunes dropped one spot to fourth with increases in acreage, yield and slight drop in price to a

total value of $57,041,000. In fifth, nursery products remained strong with a 12.8% increase in

total value to $53,414,000 due to increases in acreage and quantity sold. Rising to sixth,

processing tomatoes had a 36.0% increase in acreage as well as increases in yield and price to

a total value of $37,887,000. Almonds dropped to seventh with slight increase in acreage and

slight drops in yield and price to a total value of $33,155,000.

 

For more information or to access a proof of ownership form approved by this

office please see the Agricultural Commissioner’s website:

 

http://www.co.sutter.ca.us/doc/government/depts/ag/aghome

 

There are similar ordinances in place in Butte, Tehama, Glenn, and Yuba

counties, and in several counties to the south.

 

To see the entire report, visit this link:

www.suttercounty.org/doc/government/depts/ag/ag_crop_reports

 

Yuba County

 

Yuba County walnut buying period also began on November 8, 2019.  

 

The Walnut Buying Period is the declared end of harvest of the Chandler variety of walnuts by the Agricultural Commissioner, after consultation with a committee of walnut growers-- during which non-processing walnut buying operations within Yuba County may lawfully purchase and receive walnuts that have not been dried or processed.    Walnuts are the second highest-valued agricultural commodity in Yuba County, with 16,269 harvested acres with a market value of approximately $42,299,000, according to the 2018 Yuba County Crop Report. 

 

For further information, including the ordinance, FAQ’s and Proof of Ownership documentation, please visit: http://www.co.yuba.ca.us/Departments/Ag/nuttheftordinance.aspx 

He was getting old and paunchy

And his hair was falling fast,

And he sat around the Legion,

Telling stories of the past.

Of the war that he once fought in

And the deeds that he had done,

In his exploits with his buddies;

They were heroes, every one.

And 'tho sometimes, to his neighbors

His tales became a joke,

All his buddies listened quietly

For they knew where of he spoke.

But we'll hear his tales no longer,

For ol' Joe has passed away,

And the world's a little poorer

For a Veteran died today.

He won't be mourned by many,

Just his children and his wife.

For he lived an ordinary,

Very quiet sort of life.

He held a job and raised a family,

Going quietly on his way;

And the world won't note his passing,

'Tho a veteran died today.

When politicians leave this earth,

Their bodies lie in state,

While thousands note their passing

And proclaim they were great.

Papers tell their life stories,

From the time that they were young,

But the passing of a Veteran

Goes unnoticed and unsung.

Is the greatest contribution

To the welfare of our land,

Some jerk who breaks his promise

And cons his fellow man?

Or the ordinary fellow,

Who in times of war and strife,

Goes off to serve his country

And offers up his life?

The politician's stipend

And the style in which he lives,

Are often disproportionate

To the service that he gives.

While the ordinary Veteran,

Who offered up his all,

Is paid off with a medal

And perhaps a pension, small.

It was not the politicians

With their compromise and ploys,

Who won for us the freedom

That our country now enjoys.

Should you find yourself in danger,

With your enemies at hand,

Would you really want some cop-out,

With his ever-waffling stand?

Or, would you want a Veteran,

His home, his country, his kin

Just a common Veteran,

Who would fight until the end?

He was just a common veteran

And his ranks are growing thin,

But his presence should remind us

We may need his likes again.

For when countries are in conflict,

We find the Veteran's part

Is to clean up all the troubles

That the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honor

While he's here to hear the praise,

Then at least let's give him homage,

At the ending of his days.

Perhaps just a simple headline

In the paper that might say

“Our country is in mourning,

for a veteran died today.”

Noting that California farmers and ranchers have long sought reforms and improvements to immigration laws that would enhance the lives of agricultural employees and their families, the California Farm Bureau Federation said it supports a bipartisan bill'

 

 The Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019, introduced by Reps. Zoe Lofgren, D-San Jose, and Dan Newhouse, R-Wash., would improve agricultural visa programs and accommodate immigrant agricultural employees already in the United States, while assuring border security.

 

 “This comprehensive legislation contains key elements that address current and future workforce needs for agricultural employers and employees in California and throughout the nation,” CFBF President Jamie Johansson said. “The reforms in the Farm Workforce Modernization Act of 2019 will provide much-needed solutions for agricultural employers and employees.”

 

 The act would allow immigrant agricultural employees in the United States to earn legal status through continued agricultural employment.

 

 “We need to deal fairly with the existing agricultural workforce and their immediate families,” Johansson said. “The people who work on farms and ranches are valued members of rural communities. Their contributions to our communities and our food system should be recognized by allowing them a chance to gain legal status.”

 The bill would also modernize and streamline the existing H-2A agricultural visa program, to provide more flexibility for employers and ensure critical protections for foreign employees.

 

 “Improvements to the H-2A program would make it much more flexible and valuable to California farm employers and employees,” Johansson said. “For example, a pilot program in the bill would allow H-2A employees to move from farm to farm for employment, a portability option California producers have long sought. And, for the first time, the bill would accommodate guestworker visas for year-round operations such as dairies and nurseries.”

Marysville, Ca.

 

 Marysville Police Department received a $35,000.00 grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety (OTS) for a one-year enforcement and education program. The money will fund various activities intended to reduce deaths and injuries on California roads.

 

Traffic safety has always been a top priority for our agency and for the community. This grant will allow us to work on a variety of traffic safety issues that we otherwise would not have been able to achieve.

 

The grant-related activities are for the 2020 federal fiscal year, which runs from Oct. 1, 2019 to Sept. 30, 2020.

The funding from the OTS will be used for numerous programs, including:

 

  • DUI/driver’s license checkpoints.
  • Patrols specifically looking for suspected alcohol and/or drug-impaired drivers.
  • Patrols targeting the primary causes of crashes: Speeding, improper turns, running stop signs or signals, right-of-way violations and driving on the wrong side of the road.
  • Traffic safety education presentations for youth and community members on distracted and impaired driving, bicycle and pedestrian safety.
  • Creating “Hot Sheets” identifying repeat DUI offenders.
  • Officer training to identify suspected impaired drivers and conduct sobriety tests.

“Getting in a vehicle remains one of the most dangerous things we do,” OTS director Barbara Rooney said. “We must continue to work with our partners in law enforcement to shift that realization and make traveling on our roads safer.”

 

Funding for this program was provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety, through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

 

Sutter County

 

joncoupal hp            Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, will  be the featured speaker at the Sutter County Taxpayers Association luncheon meeting on Tuesday,  October 29.  The subject of his talk will be “The Threat to Proposition 13 on the 2020 ballot and other tax issues.”

 

            Coupal has been with HJTA for 28 years.  He is a recognized legal expert in California fiscal affairs and has argued numerous tax cases before the courts, including Proposition 62 guaranteeing the right to vote on local taxes.  He is the principal drafter of Proposition 218, the Right to Vote on Taxes Act, a measure passed by the voters in November 1996. 

 

            “Our program will be interesting and informative.  We encourage members of the public to join us,” said Pat Miller, president of the Taxpayers Association.  The noon luncheon meeting will be at noon at Hillcrest Plaza, 210 Julie Drive, Yuba City.  Cost is $25 with advance reservations required. 

 

            Reservations may be made by calling Pat Miller at 673-6562 or Elaine Miles at 671-7916.

Marysville, Ca..

 

The City of Marysville Fire Department will be better equipped to respond to water-related emergencies with the help of funding from Yuba Water Agency. 

 

As part of the Bill Shaw Rescue Equipment and Training Grant Program, Yuba Water today approved a grant, worth up to $10,000, to help the department purchase new swift-water rescue equipment. Much of the current equipment is near the end of its service life and is in need of replacement. 

 

“The Marysville Fire Department provides crucial rescue and emergency services for Yuba County residents and people recreating along the Yuba River,” said Yuba Water Agency Director Mike Leahy. “This new equipment will ensure that they are properly equipped to respond to dangerous situations.”

 

The funding from Yuba Water Agency allows the department to purchase new ropes, soft and hard rigging gear, and rescuer and patient harnesses. 

 

Like all Bill Shaw Grants, the agency is able to make these funds available because the first-responders may be called upon to provide emergency support to Yuba Water Agency’s facilities and staff, or to people recreating at its lakes or on the Yuba River. 

 

Yuba Water Agency’s Bill Shaw Rescue Equipment and Training Grant Program, which was created in 2018, is designed for first-responder agencies in Yuba County and will cover the one-time costs of up to $10,000 per applicant annually, associated with the purchase of rescue equipment and specialized personnel training.

 

Since its inception, the program has supported 14 agencies with $168,500 in grants.        

There will be a Resolution submitted to the New California State Senate and Assembly at the 5th Constitutional Convention in Irvine, CA October 25-26 regarding the governorship of New California State. New California State is a new state in development forming from the state of California following Article IV, Section 3 of the U.S. Constitution.

 

The New California State governor will be an appointed transitional position and will perform the duties required to form the new state. As required by Article IV, Section 3, following the approval of both the state legislature of California and then of the U.S. Congress, elections will be conducted statewide in New California State for all state, county and federal positions including two U.S. Senators and members of the House of Representatives.

 

The New California State Governor must be of the highest integrity and capable to govern a state with a population of over 18 million citizens. There are only a few people capable in the United States today who posse these qualities.

 

New California State has been reaching out to these people and hope to have a name to accompany the Resolution to be submitted at the 5th Constitutional Convention.

 

Since declaring Independence from the State of California on January 15, 2019 the New California State movement has filed 90 of 95 Grievances against the state of California.

 

 WEBSITE www.newcaliforniastate.com   email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

New California is a new state in development exercising it’s Constitutional Right to form from the State of California. The process to form New California is authorized and codified in Article 4 Section 3 of the United States Constitution.

Marysville, Ca.

 

Certain requirements must be met

 

Survivors of the 2018 Camp Fire in Butte County who relocate to Yuba County may now be able to transfer the base year value of their damaged or destroyed property to the replacement property, according to Yuba County Assessor Stephen Duckels.

 

 A resolution adopted by the Yuba County Board of Supervisors earlier this year makes such a transfer of base value possible, in instances where there is a Governor-declared disaster.

 

 “What this means is that, if certain requirements are met, you may be able to transfer the assessed value of your property in Butte County to your property recently purchased in Yuba County and benefit from property tax based on your prior assessed value rather than the market value of the replacement residence,” Duckels said.

 

 The main requirements that must be met are:

 

  • * The original property was owned and occupied as a principal residence
  • * The replacement property is owned and occupied by the same person as a principal residence
  • * The market value of the replacement property at the time of purchase is of equal or lesser value than the market value of the original property immediately prior to the disaster
  • * The replacement property is purchased or newly constructed within three years, following the date of damage or destruction

 Those who believe their property may qualify for this benefit should contact the Yuba County Assessor’s Office by phone at 749-7820 or visit the Assessor’s Office at the Yuba County Government Center, located at 915 8th Street, Suite 101, in Marysville.

Yuba City, Ca.

 

A Patriot and Proud Founder of Latinos for Trump

 

The Feather River Tea Party Patriots announced Marco Gutierrez, Founder of Latinos for Trump, will be the Special Guest Speaker for their next meeting, Monday, October 21, 2019.

 

feather river teaMarco TrumpMarco will share his perspective on illegal immigration, sanctuary cities, the pardoning and clemency granted to illegal alien criminals, and free healthcare.  

 

Marco was born in Mexico and immigrated to the US as a teenager after raising his brothers and sisters in his home in Jalisco, Mexico.  His parents left him with the tremendous responsibility of caring for his siblings while they found work here in the United States.  Reagan’s amnesty program finally reunited the family in 1991 and Marco began his journey from immigrant teen to defender of the American dream.

 

Enter the 2016 election.  He founded “Latinos 4 Trump” and as the group grew “Latinos 4 Trump” signs became a common sight at counter protests, Trump events, and street rallies. His leadership put him in front of the news cameras more than once and he learned the danger of fake news first hand.

 

Marco could see Trump’s “America First’ stance would bring back the American dream not just for him and other Hispanics, but for all Americans.

 

As a family man with 6 beautiful kids, Marco admits it’s hard to fit it all in. Yet the feeling of hope for the future of our country keeps him driving forward and setting the trend for other patriots to follow. 

Marco Gutierrez is what Americanism is and was always meant to be.  He is a defender of the American dream and the American way of life.

 

Don’t forget – Our regular feature In The News with Paul Preston, Agenda 21 Radio Host and New California State movement President.  Paul will follow our Special Guest Speaker and will be discussing events of the day.

 

Everyone is welcome.  There is no membership and no cost to attend.  The Feather River Tea Party Patriots meeting starts at 6:30 p.m. sharp and will be held at the Crossroads Community Church, 445 B Street, Yuba City.  Doors open at 6:00 p.m.; come early to register, socialize with like-minded patriots, and get a good seat. 

 

Contact Larry or Carla for Information: (530) 755-4409.

Visit our website: https://featherriverteapartypatriots.ning.com/

Placer County, Ca.

 

 Caltrans Also Activating Three New Ramp Meters on the Corridor

 

 In an effort to relieve congestion and make merging safer for motorists, Caltrans announced plans to activate three new ramp meters next week and initiate around-the-clock ramp metering on all freeway entrances to southbound State Highway 65 from Lincoln to Roseville.

 

Starting Monday, October 14, the three meters going live are: Northbound Galleria Boulevard to southbound Highway 65; southbound Stanford Ranch Road to northbound Highway 65; and northbound Industrial Avenue in Lincoln to southbound Highway 65. The meters will have expanded hours of operation, which will allow these signals to also manage non-commute congestion with on demand metering.

At the same time, seven other ramp meters on southbound Highway 65 from Rocklin to Roseville will expand hours of operation. Traffic metering will take place anytime or day during the daytime or nighttime hours when there is heavy traffic congestion on the freeway.

 

The seven ramp meters affected are:

 

  • Eastbound and westbound Pleasant Grove Boulevard on-ramps to southbound Highway 65.
  • Eastbound and westbound Blue Oaks Boulevard on-ramps to southbound Highway 65.
  • Eastbound and westbound Sunset Boulevard on-ramps to southbound Highway 65.
  • Westbound Whitney Ranch Parkway to southbound Highway 65.

Currently, six of these ramp meters – except for Whitney Ranch – operate from 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. Mondays through Fridays and 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays.

 

This is the first time Caltrans will operate anytime metering for freeway on-ramps in the greater Sacramento Valley region. To alert motorists of the upcoming changes, the meters will rest on green this week.

 

Studies have found ramp meters are an effective way to reduce freeway congestion and collisions, improve travel time and make merging onto the freeway safer.

 

Caltrans District 3 is responsible for maintaining and operating 4,385 lane miles in 11 Sacramento Valley and Northern Sierra counties. Caltrans issues updates about road conditions on Twitter @CaltransDist3 and on Facebook at CaltransDistrict3.

 

 

Yuba City

 

 At 3:10 pm on Thursday, October 10, 2019 a previous collision had caused Hwy 20 to be blocked at Frontage Rd, west of S. Butte Rd.

 

The driver, a 54 year old male, of a 2008 Nissan on eastbound Hwy 20 in the #2 lane, either slowing or at a stop in traffic. Richard Brian Heryford, 56, was driving a 2016 Ford eastbound on Hwy 20 east of Lytle Rd in the #2 lane at a stated speed of 50-55 mph approaching the Nissan. Heryford diverted his attention from the road and failed to see traffic ahead. Heryford collided with the rear of the Nissan, causing fatal injuries to the driver. Heryford remained at the scene and declined medical treatment. Alcohol or drug intoxication is not suspected to have contributed to this collision.

 

The name of the Nissan driver is being withheld pending notification of family.