By Boots Johnson

 

Reports tell us the poor salmon fishing on the Sacramento River and Feather River is also the situation on the Smith and American Rivers as well. We are told the only place to score on salmon is the Barge Hole and Woodson Bridge areas on the Sacramento River if you don’t mind crowds and tangled lines.

 

It is that time of year when the wind blows, the leaves fall, the sunny days are replaced with cooler temperatures and some fishing areas are closed for the winter. In addition, this time of year is the best bet to score on a large trout in lakes and reservoirs or steel-head in local rivers.

 

Englebright Reservoir, above Marysville is putting out some nice rainbows at this time. The fish are hitting night crawlers behind flashers in the middle of the lake.

 

Spotted bass are holding at between 20 and 40 feet of water at Lake Oroville. Best bet is to troll lures at this depth or try jigs.

 

Reservoirs are dropping and many have or are turning over which will put the fish more to the surface than down deep. Water temperatures have dropped some but expect this to be more intense with the coming cooler weather.

 

We checked with our weather source. He has predicted cooler days and night through October and into the first week of November. He also told us to expect early snow this year along with lots of rain this winter.

Shore anglers at Lake Davis, which is located near Portola, have had success using power bait or inflated night crawlers. Mallard seems to be the best area. Flies such as Woolly buggers are doing well on or near the surface. Surface temperature has been running around 53 degrees. All docks here have been removed for the winter.

 

As we reported last week Eagle Lake near Susanville has turned over. Anglers on the know have been scoring trolling flies on the surface of the water. All hazardous markers and buoys have been removed for the winter ahead. Boaters are advised to be cautious at this time.

 

Closing thought: “I love it when someone’s laugh is funnier than the joke.”

About a year ago I penned an article about the recent, as in a decade or so, movements to destroy, relocate or otherwise deface historical artifacts like statues and monuments because of political correctness.

Civil war statues are moved from courtyards or courthouses, protesters deface or destroy them, sports team’s names are under fire, once famous food branding is altered or changed altogether. The list goes on and on.

 

My original article took the spin that an historic work of art or plaque, saying or allowing representation of, displaying or promoting, or just allowing such historic things to exist in today’s time no more says that you support whatever it was that it signified, just as removing or altering such a thing indicates that you don’t.

Here is an example to illustrate what I’m talking about:

 

A friend of mine got a pair of healing snakes tattooed on her leg and when I asked why, was told to represent she was healing from a past relationship. Such a story might also apply to a lovers name tattooed on one’s arm. She had one of those too. Go figure right?

 

The reality of it is just because you have a healing snake tattoo doesn’t mean you are necessarily healing and not having one doesn’t mean you aren’t.

 

The same could be said tattooing a lovers name doesn’t mean you love them anymore and not having one doesn’t mean you love them less.

 

Ditto for destroying or defacing, removing or altering civil war flags or statues. Just because you did doesn’t mean racism no longer exists and just because their on display doesn’t mean you support slavery.

Travel down that path and half the world’s art and artifacts would go up in a protestor’s puff of smoke.

These are historic artifacts and a part of our history, like it or not. I where we came and that applies to all Americans.  Many of these pieces are precious works of art.

 

So following their logic, if you could call it that, Rome killed Christians because of their religion. Obviously a restriction of religious freedom and a major violation of human rights. Shall we destroy all Roman statues or knock down the Coliseum?

 

Hitler attempted and partially succeeded in massacring an entire race. Shall we now destroy all the WW2 German artifacts? Or is it simply we pick and choose because of the amount of time that has passed.

Obviously Rome was a long time ago, so apparently it's ok we let those artifact remain. Wait minute, the Nazi regime was only about 80 years ago, and the Civil War 158 years ago. But WW2 artifacts are ok but the civil war is not?

 

Humm.

 

Something's not adding up. Perhaps those that want certain past representations destroyed because of bias yet allow other artifacts to remain have their reasoning  in who or what group was enslaved, killed or tortured rather than a blanket protest against discrimination itself?

 

Let’s see now. The Nazi’s targeted Jews and the Romans hunted the Christians.

 

Suppose I dare not go there.

 

In any case the logic is idiotic and the acts ridiculous. The hurling of rocks at civil war statues. The destruction of certain collector flags, the removal of a gold miner statue at a college in so called respect of the Native Americans because gold mining was a scourge of native lands. The removal of books like Huckleberry Finn from certain school districts. Even flying an American flag can get you into trouble in some places apparently because it means you support a certain President.

 

I would say “what the ----“ but this is a family newspaper and I’m supposed to be a respectable columnist.

In any case the latest in the saga of the destruction of American culture akin to the Nazi’s burning books the political correctness Gestapo have set their sights on Mel Brooks and his   award winning film “Blazing Saddles”. Those of you who saw it, and likely not many haven’t, know its contents. I won’t hash it out for the four or so people who haven’t seen the flick but just know it’s a parody on racism set in cowboy times.

It’s a ridiculous assumption to think Mel Brooks, a brilliant film producer, is a racist. In fact he is a Jew and made another film just as controversial called “The Producers” which takes a similar tact on the Nazi regime. And to destroy or not air the film or even protest it is another in many slippery slopes those that advocate such things are going down.

 

That the social warriors of correctness continue their zero tolerance practices against anything they find offensive, the irony and contradiction is too funny for words. Actually it’s not funny at all.

 

Considering all the works of art and books that the Nazi’s burned and destroyed, it’s a sick twist on life that those trying to preserve their so called perfect view of America, in aiming for a world with no references to intolerance to be left standing, that in course of their self-administered “purification” of America, they are not only wiping clean some of its history, they are acting a lot like the subjects they so abhor in the two Mel Brooks films.

 

Think that ever dawned on them? Not likely. They’re too busy trying to find more examples of intolerance that they can’t tolerate.

 

Marc Cuniberti hosts “Money Matters” on KVMR FM aired on 65 radio stations nationwide. He is a financial columnist for a variety of publications. Marc holds a BA in Economics from SDU with honors 1979. His website is moneymanagementradio.com and he can be reached at (530) 559-1214.

 

Visit him on Facebook (FB) under Marc Cuniberti and also on the "Money Matters” and “Money Matters Investing in Community" FB pages. The views expressed are opinions only.

Featuring the Voices of: Oscar Isaac, Charlize Theron, and Chloë Grace Moretz

Rated: PG

Runtime: 1 Hour and 27 Minutes

2/5

 

            A Macabre family is driven from their homeland by a frightened populace and find respite by infesting an abandoned insane asylum. Through the years the family settle into a routine of casual torture and attempted murder, said routine is interrupted when a new town is built in the idyllic vision of a reality TV, home designer.

 

            The Addams Family, earns two out of five, Sword Dancing Monkeys. The story seems to be written more as a sight gag film than a fully realized premise. The animation is crisp in its style and reveals an interesting palate. The voice acting is top notch larynx acrobatic gold.

 

            The Addams Family, is a fun film to see at home after it is released to streaming and video, not so much worth the price of a ticket to see on the big screen. However, if you are a fan of the TV show, don’t listen to me go and watch what you want and enjoy, or else...

The latest in economic figures out from the Commerce Department (CP) shows Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at 2.1%. GDP for the second quarter of 2019. GDP is defined as the sum of the market values, or prices, of all final goods and services produced in an economy during a period of time. (Investopedia). 2.1% puts it on par with the post 2008 expansion which many regard as anemic (The 5 Min. Forecast).

Figures from the previous quarter (1st qtr. of 2019) were also revised downward and are short of the Whitehouse target of 3%.

 

Many economists argue GDP is non-representative of the living standard of the average American as the figure includes many parameters, adjustments and assumptions that don’t apply to the day to day living expenses of the consumer.

 

The latest figures show government and consumer spending as the biggest contributor with business investment woefully lagging. Stock buybacks by companies took up some spending and that kind of makes some sense. If businesses aren’t spending money on expanding, they might opt to spend some excess cash buying back stock from the public. By taking some stock back off the market which is what happens during a stock buyback, it has a tendency to lift the stock price. Not always mind you, as once again the caveat “nothing is for sure when it comes to the stock market” comes into play.

 

One of the big questions that seems to never leave the evening news when it comes to the stock market is are the GDP figures bad enough to prompt the Federal Reserves, here forth called the Fed, to lower interest rates again just like they did on July 31st, 2019 where they dropped it for the first time since the 2008 crisis. The most watched interest rate manipulated by the Fed (fed funds rate) went from 2.25% to 2%, a quarter percent reduction.

 

What’s the thinking when it comes to dropping rates?

 

From USA Today: “The Fed lowers the fed funds rate to stimulate the economy by making it cheaper to borrow money. Rates on credit cards and home equity lines of credit track the fed funds rate closely and provide more spending power for American”.

 

More often than not, in recent decades at least, what the Fed does can have a significant impact on market reaction. As always in the markets, one never knows what the market will do as a whole, and if economic conditions deteriorate, the markets may run in anticipation of a Fed interest rate drop in response. On opposite side of the spectrum, if the economy shows itself to be booming, where normally one might think that would prompt stock buyers, the opposite might happen. Good economic news might lead to a drop in markets as investors anticipate a Fed rate increase.

 

What’s to learn from all of this and how can we use it to guide our investing? In reality, the best move is not to worry about day to day movements in the markets. My personal opinion is the common belief of holding for the long haul exposes one to a 2008 type melt down and no one can say for sure whether next time it will stop falling like it eventually did  in 09 (-54.1 % loss October 07 – March 09- The Dow- Wikipedia). Who is to say next time won’t be worse right?

 

But day to day movements due to Fed interaction can be a flash in the pan. Economic fundamentals are a more reliable indicator, at least in my opinion, to better base investing decisions on, and those fundamentals can be better evaluated and communicated to you by an economic professional obviously.

Keep in mind investing involves risk and you can lose money. Consult a qualified financial professional before making any investment decisions and do your own research before investing. This is not a solicitation to buy or sell any securities. This article expresses the opinions of Marc Cuniberti and are opinions only and should not be construed or acted upon as individual investment advice. Mr. Cuniberti is an Investment Advisor Representative through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Marc can be contacted at SMC Wealth Management, 164 Maple St #1, Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 823-2792. SMC Wealth Management and Cambridge are not affiliated.

 

His website is www.moneymanagementradio.com. California Insurance License # OL34249

By Boots Johnson

 

Fishing in the Yuba Sutter area has slowed down. The Feather River has dropped down a bit and other waters have begun getting into the winter mode. I can recall many Octobers when the weather was actually on the hot side. This is not true so far this month. Our weather source tells us he expects the last part of October to be a bit warmer, but not anything in the 90’s.

 

Lake Berryessa is still in the news, but some anglers are shaking their heads in disgust while others are jumping up and down with a big smile on their faces. We always called this kind of fishing and a hit and miss situation.

 

The fishing at Collins Lake for trout has been slow but this is about to change. The Lake received its first fall trout plant a week ago last Saturday. A thousand pounds of rainbows were dropped in the lake which should boost up the catch as soon as the fish adjust to the change. The catfish bite is still on and some nice fish have been caught.

 

Eagle Lake has turned over so the trout are near the surface at this time. Best bet is to forget about deep water and go after the trout with surface lures or flies. Stay in the shallow areas of the lake in 10 to 12 feet of water.

 

We hear from Lake Almanor. Conditions here are about the same with few boats on the water. The water temperature continues to drop and the fish here are not cooperating with just about any type of bait fishing or trolling.

 

The brown and rainbow trout in Lake Tahoe are feeding in the shallows at this time. Best bet here is to troll with flashers and worms or minnows.

 

There is definitely a chill in the air early in the morning and the leaves are beginning to turn color and fall to the ground. I love this time of year as Mother Nature signals the end of another summer and the beginning of winter. Of course, there is also a ton of work to be done in regard cleanup and of course getting the boat and tackle ready for a siesta until spring.

 

Closing thought: “The secret to a long life is to eat half, walk double, laugh triple and love without measure.”

 

 

 

At the Studio Movie Grill in Rocklin

 

            Twenty some odd years ago the heavy metal band, Metallica, teamed up with the San Francisco Symphony in a collaboration that melded two forms of music into one amazing performance that true fans can celebrate. This was a fun experience and everyone in the theater seemed to really enjoy it.

 

            I am in no way a music critic so I will give no evaluation to the quality of the music. I do however have a feel for venue experiences. Ordering dinner and drinks while watching a movie or in this case a concert is new to me and it was an interesting experience.

 

            Tickets can be purchased online or at the door. Once seated a waiter brings a menu and starts a tab. You push a button when you are ready to order, the waiter takes your order and the food is delivered directly to your seat. You may order more food or drinks during the show. This is not any more distracting than someone getting up to go to the snack bar during the film. At the end of the performance or movie your bill is brought to you and you sign it and go home. Tickets were $15.00 per person and dinner was $45.00 for two of us. Regular movie tickets will cost less than special events.

 

The theater was clean and the staff was friendly and the seats were comfortable. All in all it was a good experience and worth the drive to see. I personally will save it for a movie that will be epic or to go with a group of friends. As if I have those.

With Bernie Sanders all but out of the presidential race due to a recent heart condition, the Democratic favorite seems to be Elizabeth Warren. But for the Democrats this presents a bit of a problem. Her and Joe Biden are neck and neck according to some poles.

 

Of course  Biden has his own political problems that will no doubt surface should he be the candidate to represent the Democratic Party. It would definitely be a battle and the perception of him being a good old boy and  white male candidate he may not appeal to some more left leaning voters. Elizabeth Warren on the other hand is leaning more socialistic than many in the main stream would prefer. The money obviously is more supporting Donald Trump with Trump having raised at least five times more money than the opposition. Apparently Wall Street fears  the socialism  represented by Warren and in an  attempt to compete with Warren, Joe Biden has also been more socialistic in his rhetoric of late.

 

That said the more well spoken and “cleaner” candidate for the Democrats in my opinion is Elizabeth Warren. No doubt this fact is scaring some Democrats as they realize that she may be just too radical and socialistic to be actually elected. Enter another candidate of which some may have expected but I did not. Apparently in recent polls Hillary Clinton is running third among Democratic candidates.

 

And she’s not even running. 

 

The rumor is that she will enter the race lead as a savior to the Democratic Party. Obviously the stench of the Clinton candidacy will rub some the wrong way but when you think about it, she would be the most main street in comparison to Trump. Fact is she has been close to the White House in her previous role both as first lady and in various appointed official positions.

 

Of course  the initial fanfare around a Hillary entrance would be great and that might give her enough momentum to make a serious challenge to the president.

 

She would be the first woman president and a president that, to the chagrin of many, is a buddy of Wall Street. No doubt the rumors of her paling up with her Wall Street buddies might be an issue, having made millions in speaking engagements to various banks and the like. This might hurt her some but in comparison to Trump those rumored connections shouldn’t hurt her much. I have to admit I was surprised when I heard the strategy and the possibility that she would be running. Although I won’t vote for her myself I think that particular possibility give the Democrats the best chance at a serious run at the White House. It will remain to be seen whether she can beat Trump but having heard it just a few days ago and dissecting the strategy, in my opinion it borders on brilliant. 

 

Keep in mind there will be people that will not vote for her no matter what, but compared to the other candidates that are in the race, this may be the Democrats only glimmer of hope.

 

Surprised?

 

I was.

By Boots Johnson

 

Reports keep coming in about the salmon run getting better. We hear the catch is better above Gridley and some anglers are having luck in the Sacramento River, but we have not heard of any outstanding success at this time.

 

Lake Tahoe is still on the mackinaw bite with lots of action from the South Shore of the lake. Fishing is also good to fair on the North Shore. The kokanee have entered Taylor Creek to spawn. This creek has access, trails and information available and if you go you can stand right next to the stream to see the fish. There will also be several mallard ducks to entertain you as they dive for the roe and once in a while a bear will appear out of the forest and brush areas. This would be a wonderful experience for the kids whether they fish or not. Best time to go is now and into October. The entrance to the area is located off of State Route 89 several miles from South Lake Tahoe. Watch for the signs on the right side of the highway.

 

The forest service is starting to close campgrounds in the high country and it is getting very cold up that way. If you decide to give it one more shot we suggest warm clothes and prepare for a possible storm.

Lake Berryessa is putting smiles on anglers with success on bass very good at this time. The fish are good size with some in the three pound range.

 

We have another report of a big catfish caught, but this time it is not at Collins Lake. We are told the catfish was over ten pounds and was caught in the Sutter Bypass. The bait used is unknown, but the lucky angler did say it was stink bait of a private recipe.

 

Closing thought: “Don’t look back……you are not going that way. Instead make today ridiculously wonderful.”

Foothill Thrift Shop plans to have a major half-price sale from Oct. 30 through Nov. 9. This clearance is necessary as they get ready for the holiday season. They will be unable to accept donations from Nov. 1 to January 1. Come by and take advantage of a real bargain.

 

Our communities often come together with great volunteer programs. The Thrift Shop and the Fire Department are just two examples. Farmer's Market was a brain child of a few people and did a lot of good through the summer. Books & More had a hot dog lunch a while ago and the number of people working to set it up was impressive, about six people working together, were enjoying each other's company. Our next volunteer effort will be a community van. We have the van, donated by a local couple, and now to work out the plan. We will be looking for drivers as well as people needing rides. There will be a charge for rides that will help cover gas and insurance. We plan to offer rides to Stone Soup, local businesses as well as a ride to town. Perhaps the van will be available for group field trips. Sounds good; now to get the Van Plan together.

           

The Foothill Pantry will be serving up their annual Fall Pancake Breakfast Fundraiser on Saturday, October 18 at the Alcouffe Center from 8:30 am to 11:00 am. Breakfast will include all you can eat pancakes, 2 each of bacon and sausage, fresh fruit salad and beverage. Tickets can be purchased at the door. Adults are $6.00 and kids, 11 and under are $3.00. Stop by and check out the bake sale table. The Alcouffe Center is located on Marysville Road in Oregon House.

           

Look Back in Time – In 1926 LaPorte cattlemen A.L. And A. A. Bustillos drove their cattle out of the mountains to winter range near Durham (now we transport them in trucks).

           

Hope to see you in Brownsville soon.            Christine and Yvonne

Farms provide more agritourism opportunities

 

Pumpkin patches are popular destinations this time of year, but there are other ways for people to get a taste of the countryside and experience agriculture. Farms that open their doors to the public are increasingly offering overnight lodging, farm-to-table dinners and events, and workshops to attract visitors and generate more tourism revenue. These offerings often showcase the farm's property and what it produces.  

 

High-severity wildfires may indefinitely alter California's forests

 

A new study says California's increasingly intense fires may erase some of the state's forests indefinitely. Scientists found that five to 10 years after a high-severity burn, many forest stands had converted to shrub fields with low diversity of plant species. Authors said current fire trends could prevent forest recovery in large portions of the Sierra Nevada landscape, and suggested the expansion of forest thinning and prescribed burning as management tools.

 

Underserved and veteran farmers to benefit from $16.2 million in USDA grants

 

The U.S. Department of Agriculture announced it will issue $16.2 million in grants to provide farmers, ranchers and foresters who are socially disadvantaged or veterans with training, outreach and technical assistance. Grants are awarded to higher education institutions, nonprofits and community-based organizations to reach historically underserved communities. The program has awarded 484 grants totaling $119.5 million since 2010.

 

New robotic arm aids workflow, safety in university lab

 

There's a new worker in Fresno State's citrus processing laboratory: It's a robotic arm designed to move and arrange boxes of produce. The automated arm has a nearly 7-foot reach and a 150-pound payload capacity, and can also be tasked with inspection, packaging and machine tending. The lab and equipment are used for an industrial technology course that emphasizes citrus processing line operation, safety and maintenance.

Starring: Joaquin Phoenix, Robert De Niro, and Zazie Beetz

Rated: R 

Runtime: 2 Hours 1

Minute 2/5

 

            A mentally ill man struggles to find his place in, Gotham City. After the social program that provided his counseling and medicine is cut and events from his past are revealed, he takes a more active roll in the direction of his life, to the detriment of others.

 

            Joker, earns two out of five, Stair Dancing Monkeys. The story is dark and gets darker, the characters have few redeeming qualities, standard for a DC Universe film. The acting is superbly done and the cinematography is reminiscent of late seventies early eighties films.

 

            This movie starts in a dark malevolent place and spirals down into deeper darker madness with every scene. There are few scenes that entertain, mostly they move from bizarre to strange and then over to, unpleasant to behold. The value of this film will be the spotlight it puts on mental illness and hopefully how, we as a society, can help manage the problem. Not a film for those who do not have a firm grasp on reality or anyone else for that matter.

Stone Soup is planning another unique interesting lunch menu. About once a quarter the soup pots are put away and a new dish is planned. This one will happen on Halloween, Oct. 31, at noon. We hope you will come join us at Ponderosa Community Center.

 

            The annual quilt show in Brownsville is coming up soon. Put November 2 and 3 on your calendar and plan to come see the beautiful quilts that have been made this year. The show will be at the Ponderosa Community Center from 10 to 4 on Saturday and 10 to 3 on Sunday. Lunch will be served. The wares from many interesting vendors will be available so we hope you make it and bring friends and neighbors.

 

            The YES Charter Academy in Oregon House will be holding their 7th Annual Harvest Festival on October 11 from 5 pm – 7 pm. There will be a raffle, auction, games, hay ride, face painting, live music and a chili cookoff dinner. Free entry. Sounds like great family fun! YES Charter Academy is located on Texas Hill Rd.

            Yikes! Seems like we were just cleaning up the Christmas decorations and here it is Halloween already. Gold Eagle Markets and the Foothill Volunteer Firefighters Association will be sponsoring a Trunks with Treats event in the parking lot of the Foothill Firehouse. There will be games, food, bounce house and more. Other local businesses will also have treats available in there parking lots. Please bring your vehicles and candy so the ghoulies can trick or treat along the parked vehicles. There will be space at the parking lots of the firehouse, Brownsville Mercantile and Books & More. The event will be 5 pm – 8 pm.

 

Foothill Lions Club will also have Trick or Treat Street, for kids 12 and under, from 6:30 – 7:30 at the Lions Club at 5667 Fruitland Rd. in Loma Rica. Bring your decorated vehicles and candy for the kids to trick or treat.

 

            Look Back in Time – In 1925 Challenge students had transportation to Dobbins High School

(it would be great to have the choice to not go all the way to Marysville).

 

            Hope to see you in Brownsville soon.            Christine and Yvonne

By Boots Johnson

 

The salmon run is finally here with success on both the Sacramento and Feather Rivers. The experts tell us the run should be good to excellent for the rest of October. Reports tell us the Feather River is the best bet at this time with fish being caught from 7 to 25 pounds with a couple exceeding 30 pounds. Jacks are in the system along with the kings. The fish are both fresh and on the dark side. We figure the bite is better on the Feather River due to the water being a degree or more cooler which means the salmon coming up the Sacramento River will make a right turn at Verona  into the Feather. The usual lures and bait are the ticket with spinners also a good bet.

 

The Rio Vista Bass Derby and Festival is scheduled for October 10th to the 13th. This event is the oldest bass derby in California and all are invited. This includes the kids. They are having some fantastic awards with big dollars up for grabs with the winner of the derby will take home $3000.00. For more information go to their website at www.bassfestival.com.

 

The Department of Fish and Wildlife planted French Meadows last week with a bunch of planters. The also dropped by and released a ton of fish in to Lake Berryessa.

 

We again hear from Collins Lake above Browns Valley.  This is about the third time this had been reported. It appears another record has hit the skids due to the fish not being weighed on officially. The monster catfish was said to weigh 27 pounds. The fish, which fell for anchovies, was caught by Chuck Clemensen who resides at Oregon House. The location in the reservoir was not disclosed. Kudos, Chuck!

 

Most of those who fish the reservoirs in Northern California are waiting for the changes in Autumn. The change is about to be complete which will bring better fishing for all.

Closing thought:  “When things change inside you, things change around you.”

Since the 2008 crisis, the Federal Reserve injected somewhere in the area of 5 trillion dollars into the banking system both here and abroad to help stabilize the financial system that was spiraling out of control due to the real estate implosion which began in 2008.

 

They also guaranteed another 7 trillion or so (https://michael-hudson.com/2011/06/how-a-13-trillion-cover-story-was-written/) of debt from various institutions.

 

It’s safe to say things have calmed down a bit since then, with the markets rising to new highs and the real estate market taking off the to the proverbial races since 2011.

 

That said, last week witnessed a blast from the past in an area the financial market the average Joe Blow doesn’t really understand or probably even know it exists. This seldom discussed but very important marketplace is the “Overnight Repurchase Agreements” (repos) mechanism.

 

The repo market is the plumbing of the financial system. Banks and market funds of all types rely on this market to finance their day to day operations. Billions of dollars flow into and out of this market daily. It’s where business and investment firms of all types draw on funds to operate, while still others deposit excess funds for safekeeping and possible income. 

 

The market operates funding for as short as overnight to longer terms.

 

From CNBC:  “In a repo trade, Wall Street firms and banks offer U.S. Treasuries and other high-quality securities as collateral to raise cash, often overnight, to finance their trading and lending activities. The next day, borrowers repay their loans plus what is typically a nominal rate of interest and get their bonds back”.

Think of it as a huge octopus taking in and handing out thousands of loans a second to various branches of business and markets.

 

If demand for funds increases, the interest rates paid for accessing these loans may rise. On the contrary, if demand falls off for this type of funding, interest rates might fall.

 

The interest rates on repos usually run about 2.25% and a baseline is set by the Fed although the rate in the day to day market moves up and down based on demand. The repos typically follow the Fed baseline rate closely however last week the repo rate rose to 4% then skyrocketed to 8%.

 

Known as liquidity, it simply means the demand for quick cash was soaring. Higher than normal rates can cause serious turmoil as the cost to institutions rise past what is budgeted and expected. 8% is regarded as extremely high to put it mildly.

 

As rates climbed the Fed intervened injecting close to 53 billion dollars into the repo market starting two weeks back. The injections happen when the Feds purchase Treasuries and other debt (known as agency debt) from the various institutions known as “Primary Dealers” in the group. This is a group of 24 big banks and trading firms that have an agreement to participate in swapping debt for cash and vice versa which acts like a gas pedal to the overall money supply in the system.  

 

The intervention was the first one since 2008. Ominous sounding, the recent increase of the repo rate past is considered normal was called “bordering on chaos” by a BMO Capital Markets strategist.

 

In an opposite move last year, The Fed started selling debt back to the repo dealers over many months to the tune of 700 billion in an attempt to rid itself of some of its holdings, which the Feds had stockpiled during the crisis. Now the Feds found it necessary to reverse some of those purchases as rates climbed.

This spike and subsequent move by the Fed doesn’t necessarily mean the environment resembles 2008/09 liquidity crisis but it definitely doesn’t make this analyst sleep any better.

 

Only time will tell if the recent machinations by the Fed solved the problem and it was a simple one-off temporary occurrence or a sign of something more ominous going on in the financial gearbox of the economy.

 

Before I sent article this to publishing, on September 18th, the New York Fed printed up another $75 billion to inject into the “repo” market — on top of another $53.2 billion the day before. On September 26, the Fed added yet another 71 billion and its becoming increasing hard for me to keep current!

 

It is getting more interesting by the day.

 

Who knows how much more will be added by the time you read this?

 

This article expresses the opinions of Marc Cuniberti and are opinions only and should not be construed or acted upon as individual investment advice. Mr. Cuniberti is an Investment Advisor Representative through Cambridge Investment Research Advisors, Inc., a Registered Investment Advisor. Marc can be contacted at SMC Wealth Management, 164 Maple St #1, Auburn, CA 95603 (530) 559-1214. SMC and Cambridge are not affiliated.

 

His website is www.moneymanagementradio.com. California Insurance License # OL34249

Starring: Sylvester Stallone, Paz Vega, and Yvette Monreal

Rated: R 

Runtime: 1 Hour 29 Minutes

2/3

            An old war veteran comes home to raise help raise his niece and tend the family farm. To occupy his time, he rides horses and digs tunnels, lots and lots of tunnels. When his niece travels south of the border to find her father and falls into trouble, John J. Rambo, heads down to Mexico and true to his nature unleashes all manner of heck.

 

            Rambo: Last Blood, earns two out of five, Tunnel Running Monkeys. The story is clunky and forced, it failed to reach any depth beyond blood and mayhem. The acting is as good as can be expected. The best part of the film is the action. The scenes are brutal and bloody and induce cringes and a few gasps.

 

            Rambo: Last Blood, isn’t a horrible movie, it just isn’t worth the price to see in theaters. Sylvester Stallone performs amazingly well for even a man half his age, which is thirty-five. His fused neck makes his movement look stiff, but he still delivers a solid action packed performance. The true failing of the film was the writing, much like this article. 

Solving food waste will be complex, study says

New attention to reducing food waste represents an encouraging sign, but a new study says tackling the issue will involve complex solutions. A researcher from the University of California, Davis, who led the study says large, systemic factors on farms, at grocery stores and restaurants, and in home kitchens all contribute. The study indicates a need to focus on cultural and social factors rather than only on actions by individuals.

USDA profiles beginning farms, ranches

Beginning farms and ranches account for 17% of all farms in the nation, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The USDA study says beginning farms generally operate at a smaller scale that more-established farms, and their operators rely more on off-farm income. Meanwhile, two Californians are among 20 people appointed to serve on a USDA Advisory Committee on Beginning Farmers and Ranchers.

 

Fruit orchards provide larger crops

Tree fruit from California and the rest of the U.S. has been more plentiful. Government estimates show apple production up 4%, peach crops up 13% and the cherry harvest up 5% compared to a year ago. The overall U.S. pear crop will be similar to last year, but California production will be up 15%. Grape production will also be close to last year's, with the California table-grape crop expected to match last year's record.

 

UC looks into elderberries' potential

Native California elderberry bushes attract pollinators and other beneficial insects to farms. University of California specialists say hedgerow elderberry plantings can bring additional benefits through production of elderberry products. UC advisors are researching production practices, costs and varieties. Several farms around the state already harvest elderflowers and elderberries for creating syrups, jams and other products.

By Boots Johnson

 

Reports tell us the salmon run has slowed again and is expected to pick up soon. Both the Sacramento and Feather Rivers have been slow going with the salmon bite. Some fish are being caught, but we are told it is a hit and miss situation at this time. Guides and the rest of us are waiting for October and better fishing. However, the fish that are being caught are beautiful fish, bright and silver with big boys in the mix.

 

We checked with our weather source and he advises the current cool weather pattern is expected to be with us for another week or so and then the warmer days will be back. He also predicted an early fall this year with showers and snow coming our way on the valley floor and up in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

 

The Department of Fish and Wildlife planted Lake Davis last week with rainbow trout which included some bigger fish in the mix. The Walker fire is now almost contained and while the fire did not impact the reservoir it still caused some air traffic in the region.

 

The hot spot for Mackinaw Lake trout at Lake Tahoe is its south shore at this time.  The north shore has picked up some with good to fair results. Rainbow trout are reported to be holding at around 100 feet down with some swimming in the shallower water.

 

Donner Lake is also putting out mackinaw lake trout for shore anglers but the fish are small.

 

Foul weather and high winds have really slowed down the fishing at Lake Almanor. Reports tell us only the diehards who go out in the lake are scoring some action but basically it is slow here.

 

Kokanee Salmon are still biting at Bullard’s Bar Reservoir but are not the best bet at this time due to the changes caused by their entering spawning stage. The fish have turned dark.

 

Folsom Lake is producing nice bass, but the trout fishing has slowed considerably. The reservoir is still almost full and has begun to drop a bit. Water temperature is around 73 to 75 degrees. Most boat ramps are open.

 

Closing thought for this week: “The risk you are afraid to take could be the one that changes your life.”

 

On Saturday, October 5, Books & More will be holding a hot dog lunch. This will help support the bookstore. Hot dogs, chili and cole slaw will be served. Next Step will add a Brownie and ice cream sundae to the menu. Sounds like fun. Let's hope it does not rain.

 

The Yuba Feather Historical Association will be holding its annual election on October 23. It will follow a potluck dinner at Ponderosa Community Center starting about 6 pm. Come join in, visit with friends and neighbors and support the group that manages Yuba Feather Museum. Perhaps you would like to sign up as a volunteer.

 

October 5 will be the last day of Farmer's Market for this year. We hope you have participated in our venture and enjoyed the park setting, fresh vegetables and fruit as well as the crafts. The group setting up the market will be reflecting and reorganizing getting ready for next year. If you have suggestions, please stop by Books & More and let us know. It is definitely a community venture.

 

YES Charter Academy will be hosting their 7th Annual Harvest Festival on Friday, October 11 from 5 pm – 7 pm. There will be games, food, fun and more. This event is a fundraiser for field trips, awards, classroom extras, equipment and more. The school is located at 9841 Texas Hill Rd., Oregon House. 

 

Look Back in Time – In 1911 citizens formed a Dobbins Athletic Club. The first boxing match was between Virgil Peachy and Kid French (wonder how it went).

 

Hope to see you in Brownsville soon.           

Christine and Yvonne

 Farmers, restaurants, chefs urge passage of USMCA

More than a dozen chefs and restaurants joined California food and agricultural organizations this week in urging Congress to pass the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. In a letter to the California congressional delegation, the coalition said the USMCA would include improvements that would help California agriculture to trade fairly, which benefits farmers, restaurants and their customers by assuring availability of high-quality ingredients and affordable dining experiences. 

 

Water year 2019 leaves reservoirs with good storage

As the water year comes to a close on Sept. 30, a California Department of Water Resources storage summary showed all but three reservoirs listed running at or above their historical average. However, the wet year did not provide full water supplies for all. Customers of the State Water Project and south-of-delta agricultural water contractors of the federal Central Valley Project had 75% supplies, a fact some agriculture advocates say points to the need for additional storage.

 

Big pistachio crops find growing markets

California farmers are producing more pistachios to meet rising global demand. This year's harvest, currently underway, is expected to produce the third-largest crop in state history, and growers expect to produce the state's first billion-pound crop next year. Rising affluence in China and India, coupled with increasing health consciousness globally, are buoying demand for the nut, which has enjoyed brisk exports to China despite tariffs resulting from the ongoing trade war.

 

UC Riverside and citrus sector unveil state-of-the-art lab

In a ribbon-cutting ceremony and press conference on Thursday, project sponsors will unveil a new state-of-the-art lab in Riverside aimed at protecting California's $3.3 billion citrus sector from the fatal citrus plant disease huanglongbing, or HLB. The result of a partnership between the state's citrus growers and University of California, Riverside, The Biosafety Level-3 Lab will enable scientists to conduct research with plant pathogens that previously couldn't be done in Southern California.

I do believe either Presidential candidate Bernie Sanders is suffering from Alzheimer’s, is mentally ill, doesn’t really want to win and is sabotaging his campaigning or severely delusional.

 

In music there’s an old saying on radio: “and the hits just keep on coming”.

 

So let’s break it down for you.

 

Simply put, many of the economic plans some of the “whacked lefts” are coming out with are bordering on Donald Duck like. Sorry but no other words come out of my mouth as I read some of these proposals. Must be the type of coffee I’m drinking or something.

 

Anyway the first “deal’ coming from the whacks are the “New Green Deal”. Not new actually but a revamp of a previous fairytale, Bernie supports it.

 

If you haven’t heard the details, it’s like missing the fifth installment of “Nightmare on Elm Street’ or “Alien versus Predator”. In other words you haven’t missed much but some bodies idea of entertainment and a big waste of money.

 

Actually the movie titles fit quite well here. The Green Deal is basically a nightmare and monster attack rolled up into some bodies pipedream with no basis in economic sustainability. In other words, it’s like saying everybody gets a Lear Jet.  That would be nice but it’s not remotely feasible and the ramifications would be catastrophic. Imagine 320 million Lear jets flying around, and that would be just in the U.S.

 

So this Green Deal says we do away with Lear jets, in fact all jets, rebuild every building in America, and…..blah blah blah. You get the jest of it. Beyond crazy right?

 

So Bernie supports that. Then he comes out and says everyone should get a home. EVERYONE. I see.  On top of that all colleges should be free. Nice! Wonder what the colleges have to say about that. Last week he says he would also seek criminal charges against oil and natural gas company execs.

 

Whee!  What fun this is.

 

He calls these “programs” (lets you and I use the word delusions shall we?) “progressive, aggressive, timely and privileged”. 

Whatever.

 

Anyhow, if you can’t stop laughing, you better hold on to your lunch, because Bernie and his compadres in the asylum think a tax on the rich will pay for it all.

 

Well not “all of it” says fellow nutbag Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

 

Her plan calls for establishing a whole set of Federal banks to conjure up the money. “Conjure” is an appropriate word I guess. I am thinking: how does a bank go about “conjuring up” a couple of trillion dollars?

 

Oh wait a minute. I DID go to school and majored in economics so I know what that means. Conjure means print up. But wait another minute. Ocasio-Cortez also majored in Economics.  Whoa. This is really getting good and the plot thickens immensely.

 

So adding up all this stuff to see if we can really pay for it all and we get…… well, a lot of zeros. Like a whole lot of zeros. 

Nobody really knows how much it would cost to paint the moon a different color either and who would want to do such a thing, but since we’re all smoking something real good, let’s just figure 25 trillion to start shall we?

 

That sounds good. Likely not enough but enough to say “it’s nowhere near enough” and that’s good enough and by the way, not remotely feasible.

 

Unless of course these new Federal banks get nuclear printing presses with 7 speed automatic transmissions. Then maybe we could “conjure up” the trillions all these programs would cost. No mention how much greenhouse gases and raw materials would be “conjured up” rebuilding every building in America and building everyone a house, but what the heck. It’s a dream anyway and anything can happen in dreams.

 

Oh and the inflation it would cause? Oh gosh, I can’t even go there, not even in a dream. It would be that bad.

Seriously folks, these guys and gals are for real and there are millions of people believing this stuff. Mostly young and foolish folk, but there are some older smokers in there too.

 

In any case, back to Bernie for a rocking conclusion.

 

He won’t win. Not a snowballs chance they say. Not now, not ever.   But a derivative of him might. A lower calorie “light” version shall we say. And that will be dangerous enough.

 

Like the Nightmare on Elm Street’s Freddie Krueger who gets you when you fall asleep. Bernie is part of a dream, but the ramifications can be real if you close your eyes and fall asleep.

 

If anyone of these folks get even close to the White House, one of the first casualties will be the economy and America as we know it.  And the nightmare will only get worse from there. Stay awake America, stay awake.

 

Marc Cuniberti hosts “Money Matters” on KVMR FM aired on 65 radio stations nationwide. He is a financial columnist for a variety of publications. Marc holds a BA in Economics from SDU with honors 1979. His website is moneymanagementradio.com and he can be reached at (530) 559-1214. Visit him on Facebook (FB) under Marc Cuniberti and also on the "Money Matters” and “Money Matters Investing in Community" FB pages. The views expressed are opinions only.