yuba county pet of the week  1 17 18eet Ginger! (ID# A169552). This sweet girl is a love bug! She loves to cuddle, and will sit on your lap all day if you let her. She is about a 3-4 years old chihuahua, and, yes she is a bit over weight, but, with the right diet and exercise, will slim down a bit. She seems to get along with other dogs, and is a happy girl, especially when someone wants to play with her.

Come to the shelter and check her out. She won't disappoint if you are looking for a small, sweet, loveable pet!

UPCOMING EVENTS

Our low cost rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by North Valley Veterinary Medical Association and Yuba County Sheriff's Animal Care Services, will be held:

Saturday January 20, 2018, 10-12 p.m, at the Yuba County Sheriff's Brownsville Substation 16796 Willow Glen Rd., Brownsville.

Saturday, January 20, 2018, 2:30pm-4:30pm at Yuba County Animal Care Services.

Rabies vaccines will be $8.00, other low cost vaccines will be available. The new 2018 Yuba County Dog Licenses will be available! All Dogs must be on leashes and Cats must be in carriers.

Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to www.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to help support the shelter. The link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

Yuba county pet  Friday 1 10 18Yuba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet FRIDAY - ID# (A169541), a sweet nine years young, male Jack Russell mix. He may be older, but still has lots of love and spunk in him. Start your New 2018 Year off where you can spend every day with Friday! Our low cost rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by North Valley Veterinary Medical Association and Yuba County Sheriff's Animal Care Services, will be coming up Saturday January 20, 2018, 10am-12pm, at the Yuba County Sheriff's Brownsville Substation 16796 Willow Glen Rd., Brownsville. Also, Saturday January 20, 2018, 2:30pm-4:30pm at Yuba County Animal Care Services. Rabies vaccines will be $8.00, other low cost vaccines will be available. The new 2018 Yuba County Dog Licenses will be available! All Dogs must be on leashes, Cats must be in carriers Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

yuba county pet of  1 3 18uba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet Samson (A169517), a beautiful Seal Point/Himalayan mix. This beautiful boy spent three day stuck in a tree before he was rescued and brought to our shelter. A cat as sweet as Samson will be a great addition to your home. Come visit with us this Saturday January 6th at the Yuba City Petco from 10am-2pm. We will be there with loveable, adoptable pets looking for their “Furever Homes.” Our low cost rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by North Valley Veterinary Medical Association and Yuba County Sheriff's Animal Care Services, will be coming up Saturday January 20, 2018, 10am-12pm, at the Yuba County Sheriff's Brownsville Substation 16796 Willow Glen Rd., Brownsville. Also, Saturday January 20, 2018, 2:30pm-4:30pm at Yuba County Animal Care Services. Rabies vaccines will be $8.00, other low cost vaccines will be available. The new 2018 Yuba County Dog Licenses will be available! All Dogs must be on leashes, Cats must be in carriers Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to www.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

yuba county pet of the weekYuba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet “MO”, (ID#A169206) a three year young, brindle Boxer-Pit Bull Terrier mix. Are you up for a challenge, do you have extra energy to burn, do you like a “Let’s Go!” lifestyle that will keep you motivated to get outside and move. Then MO might be the dog for you. MO is neutered, micro-chipped and up to date on his vaccinations. This beautiful boy was owner surrendered because he likes to jump fences, so MO will need a secure yard and understanding owner with the time and patience to make him want to stay at home and not roam. Stop by and visit with MO and he just might steal your heart away. Yuba County Animal Care Services would like to wish everyone a safe and Happy New Year. The shelter will be closed from Sunday December 31st thru Tuesday January 2nd, 2018. We will resume normal shelter hours Wednesday January 3rd, see you next year!! Our low cost rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by North Valley Veterinary Medical Association and Yuba County Sheriff's Animal Care Services, will be coming up Saturday January 20, 2018, 10am-12pm, at the Yuba County Sheriff's Brownsville Substation 16796 Willow Glen Rd., Brownsville. Also, Saturday January 20, 2018, 2:30pm-4:30pm at Yuba County Animal Care Services. Rabies vaccines will be $8.00, other low cost vaccines will be available. The new 2018 Yuba County Dog Licenses will be available! All Dogs must be on leash, Cats must be in carriers Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO

By Cecilia Rice

We wish everyone a “Happy New Year” as we enter 2018. Hopefully it will be an improvement over last year which was very difficult for many people in our nation. Think positively! We have a very dry and cold December. Check on plants to be sure that they are not excessively dry. That is especially important for containerized plants since dry roots will freeze more easily than wet ones will.

Bare root season is the big thing many people look forward to in January. We have many of the smaller bare root items that arrived November. That includes berries, rhubarb, asparagus, and artichokes. We are still well stocked on those, but roses and fruit trees come a bit later. They are now here ready to take home to be planted. We usually have some folks who are new to gardening and the term ”bare root” may not be familiar to them. It is simply what it says. The trees have been taken out of the ground and the roots are exposed, thus, “bare root” . They are less expensive since the pot, soil, and time and effort to plant them into a container has been avoided. It also requires that it must be planted right away, or otherwise stored in a way to protect the roots from drying out or freezing. We have availability lists at the nursery to help one to make decisions. Bare root season for fruit trees is usually considered very late December or early January to the end of February. By then the trees are beginning get too many new fragile roots and new leaves to handle them “bare root” without possible damage. There are advantages to planting your own fruit trees. You make the decisions of what fertilizers etc. are used and avoiding many of the unknows of commercial grower’s methods. Allowing the fruit ripen on the tree allows much better flavor to develop as the fruit ripens than that picked early and ripened in cold storage. Often kids and adults are encouraged eat more fruit just because they like picking it themselves and it is close by.

There are many questions about the fruit trees, one being, do they all need pollinizers? Some are self fruitful and don’t need a different pollinizer and others do. Many of the peaches and nectarines are self fruitful, but not all of them. Most of the cherries need a pollinizer, but again, not all of them, and so it is with plums, pears Most fruit trees have a tag giving some of that information.

One thing that won’t be found during bare root season are citrus and avocado trees. They are evergreen trees. They are semi tropical trees and need protection when the weather is very cold. They will be available in the spring.

Chill hours may be noted on the tag. That refers to the cumulative number of hours required under 45 degrees during the entire winter season to provide normal fruit production and is generally not a concern in our area.

Many camellia plants have finished blooming for the year and the flowers have fallen causing a pile of debris at the base of the plant. That debris should be bagged and sent to the landfill rather than added to a compost pile you may have. It can carry a fungal disease that develops in the debris that then can scatter the spores and spread a problem that is easily avoided by the proper disposal of the debris.

Bare root roses are now available and have been pruned by the growers. If you have roses that are growing in your yard already, we suggest delaying the pruning until the danger of a heavy freeze is past. In our area roses usually don’t go completely dormant. What happens when you prune a rose? It starts putting out new growth at that point. That new growth is too tender to survive a hard freeze and dies back. We have lots of micro climates in the foothills, so consider the temperature range in your area and delay the pruning until freezing danger is past and do the pruning in early spring if it seems more appropriate. If by chance you do prune them and are then hit by freeze that damages new growth, no great harm has been done – the rose just has to expend more energy that might otherwise have been saved for its beautiful first bloom and has to start over again.

Some maintenance chores to be done in January – weather permitting –

Annual pruning of dormant deciduous plants – allow spring blooming plants to bloom, then prune

Prune dormant vines, grapes and cane berries

Rake up heavy litter of leaves and apply pre-emergent if weeds were a problem last year

Shop early for the best selections in bare root fruit trees.

Cecilia Rice is a partner wither son Jeff Rice at Bald Mountain Nursery on Bald Mountain Road in Browns Valley

Tel.9530) 743-4656 We are the unexpected nursery on a little country road.

yuba county pet of the week  12 20 17Yuba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet FAITH - ID#A167320. This beautiful lady is approximately seven months old and has been at the shelter since September 1st. Faith really deserves a “a home of her own” for Christmas. She is quiet, independent, has a beautiful, soft coat. When she is ready Faith will take all the love you have to give her. At time of adoption you can also have this little Christmas package micro-chipped for $15.00. Our low cost rabies vaccination clinics sponsored by North Valley Veterinary Medical Association and Yuba County Sheriff's Animal Care Services, will be coming up Saturday January 20, 2018, 10am-12pm, at the Yuba County Sheriff's Brownsville Substation 16796 Willow Glen Rd., Brownsville. Also, Saturday January 20, 2018, 2:30pm-4:30pm at Yuba County Animal Care Services. Rabies vaccines will be $8.00, other low cost vaccines will be available. The new 2018 Yuba County Dog Licenses will be available! All Dogs must be on leash, Cats must be in carriers Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

Yuba County Animal Care Services hasyuba county pet of the week Christmas Kittens  12 13 17, ready to go, hoping Santa will see them and make them a part of his team. We have kittens of all sizes, colors and breeds just waiting to be whisked off to a very special home of their own. A place where they can lay by a cozy warm fire, and get all the attention a kitten deserves. Santa will notice these kittens are full of spice and will bring hours of joy and love to your life. So these adorable felines will wait patiently to be whisked away to that special place all homeless animals dream of; “a home of their own.” At time of adoption you can also have your little Christmas package micro-chipped for $15.00. Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

yuba county pet of the week  12 6 17“Home for the Holiday’s” is where beautiful Cassandra (ID#A167706) would like to be. Cassandra has been with us at the shelter since September 21, 2017. Are you looking for a playful and beautiful kitten? Well look no further and come check out this little lady, who is turning into a beautiful cat. Cassandra has beautiful markings, a very soft fur coat, and a very playful personality. After she's had her fun, she likes to rest near you and get some back scratches. Maybe you have the home she is looking and wishing for. At her time of adoption you can also have her micro-chipped for $15.00. Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS. We also have an Amazon wish list if you would like to spread some holiday cheer, the link to our wish list is; Amazon.com http://a.co/7qGE7rO.

By Cecilia Rice

December is here and the 21st of December is the first day of winter. We never know what kind of weather it will bring. But whatever the weather, it is usually a busy month for nursery workers. Many different things become available at nurseries because it is the dormant season for so many trees and plants making them easier to ship without causing them damage.

December is a month that doesn’t require too much effort in the yard, though there are some things that are needed. The most important of those is the second spraying of dormant spray to keep the fungal infections at bay, and that should be done in late December. As mentioned in November, curl leaf on peaches and nectarines is the main target, and it is useful on a host of other things which can be found on the directions for use. December usually brings cold enough weather that we need to be alert for the possibility of frosty and/or freezing cold nights. All citrus trees are quite vulnerable to the cold weather because they are evergreen and sub-tropical . A light frost will likely damage the leaves of the plant, whereas a hard freeze will cause much leaf damage and fruit damage as well – best to be ready for it. An old blanket can be placed over a plant as long as it isn’t apt to rain causing it to get wet and heavy. A blanket would be best used by putting them on at night and taking them off daily in order to be exposed to the sunlight. I’ve seen large cardboard boxes sheltering plants. Frost cloth is not expensive, works well, can be held in place by tucking it under a few of the pots so wind can’t displace it, and it can be saved and re-used – just fold or roll it up and put it with other gardening supplies. It also has the advantage of being permeable enough to water plants with it in place. Adequate sunlight also reaches the plants. Plastic should not be used directly on a plant. It has no insulation quality, in fact it can direct the freezing temperature directly to the leaves. Make a temporary frame work with a few stakes several inches from the foliage of a plant and put the plastic over it as a covering, tee-pee style. Or, three to four stakes can be driven a little way into the ground to create an enclosure over which to put the plastic covering. The dead air space within has insulating quality. Time was that a light bulb could be hung in the enclosure and provide warmth, but the newer, more efficient bulbs do not emit much heat. If you have any of the older bulbs, or any strings of the old Christmas decoration lights, they can be used to keep plants warm when the weather forcasts suggest that it will be especially cold. For containerized plants, be sure that they have been very well watered when especially cold weather has been forcasted . A dry plant will freeze more quickly than a wet one. The moisture in a potted plant will freeze at 32 degrees and roots won’t get colder than that because of their insulating blanket of ice. Dry cold can be much colder and damaging. Of course, any delicate foliage on the plant will need to be covered

Are you interested in bare root fruit trees? Bundles of them will start coming in soon. It takes a bit of time to get them all organized once they arrive, but we are usually ready to offer them for sale by late December. Roses will also be here soon. If you are interested, we have availability lists to help you make choices. If you are wanting to get out to “get something done in the yard”, many smaller bare root items arrived in November that could satisfy your need to plant something. Cane berries, like raspberries and blackberries, asparagus, rhubarb and artichokes all arrived in November. Oregon stock with live Christmas trees and dogwoods and other Oregon stock usually comes in late November, so should be here and ready for sale. You can see that there are lots of possibilities for the gardeners. Many of them are also good Christmas gift possibilities as well.

Lilacs do well in our area and don’t require lots of care, but they are especially happy in very cold climates. The flowers they produce are generally larger clusters than those grown in our more temperate climates. To compensate for the lack of very cold weather, try putting ice cubes around the base of the plants several times during the winter to keep the roots colder, as they would be in snowy climates. Poinsettias are a frequent gift at this time of the year. They seem to bloom and fit right into the season with the festive red flowers. If you are given one or buy one, and the pot has a lovely foil wrapping on it, before you water it cut out a circle of the wrap on the bottom of the container, then place the plant on a saucer with a layer of pebbles to hold it out of any standing water – then water when needed. The wrap won’t become a reservoir to waterlog the plant and you will enjoy its beauty longer. We wish everyone a Joyful Christmas.

Cecilia Rice and her son Jeff Rice are partners at Bald Mountain Nursery on Bald Mountain Road in Browns Valley.

Tel. (530) 743-4856 www.baldmountainnursery.com

yuba county pet of the week  11 22 17Yuba County Featured Pet of the Week

This week Yuba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet “LUCY” (A168450), a two years young Jack Russell/Chihuahua mix. When you first meet Lucy she can be a little shy, but soon this sweet girl becomes a lap lover. Lucy likes to spread the love, so if there is an available lap she will warm it for you. She still needs some leash training, would actually like you to carry her, but with some gentle coxing she will soon be great on leash. Lucy loves children; if they are sitting on the floor she climbs right up and looks at them with so much love. Stop by and see this special girl. At her time of adoption you can also have her micro-chipped for $15.00. Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.
LUCY (A168450)

pet of the week 11 15 17Hello there! The lovely people here at the shelter have named me Sasha (ID#A166881) and I want to tell you a little bit about myself! First, I'd like to say I have a very mellow personality! I want to explore my surroundings and after I am used to the surroundings, I want love from you. I really enjoy getting love and being petted. With that, I am a very beautiful fifteen month old, female cat. I have a very soft coat that is long. The main color is black, but you'll see tints of brown throughout, especially when the light hits it the right way. I would also like to share with you that I have been at Yuba County Animal Care Services since August 14th, and am really looking to find my “Forever Home”. Well for now, that's what I'd like to share with you, I can't wait for you to come and meet me! You can also have me micro-chipped for $15.00 at the time of my adoption. Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.

yuba county pet of the week  11 8 17This week we would like to introduce you to our “Featured Pet” at Yuba County Animal Care Services, BRI - ID#A168439. Hello there, how are you?! My name is Bri and I'm here to tell you all about myself! I am a spayed female, black and white Labrador Retriever/Rottweiler mix, approximately 3 years old and have been at the shelter since October 21st. First of all, I'm quite amazing if I do say so myself. But of course none of us are perfect, so I will tell you about that shortly. I am a Labrador retriever/Rottweiler mix so I'm pretty big (almost 100 lbs.), but I know my size limitations. I don't try to jump on you, unless you motion for me to get on your lap. I'm also really good on a leash and will walk side-by-side with you, enjoying the outdoors and your company. I would make a great walking/running partner as I could stand to probably lose a few pounds, can't we all. I also love playing with toys and after you throw the toy for me, I will throw it a few times for myself! I'm sure there is some more amazing things about me, but I can't think of them right now. What I can tell you (which would be my imperfections), is that I would do best in a house without cats or smaller children. Well thank you for reading and I look forward to going on a walk with you! You can also have me micro-chipped for $15.00 at the time of my adoption. Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.

November takes us into a festive season, colder weather, and what seems like a quick trip to the closing days of 2017. There is only one “must be done” chore in November. That chore is “Dormant Spraying” with a copper based fungicide, and it is the spraying of fruit trees to prevent fungal problems, the most notable of which is “Curl Leaf” on peaches and nectarines. It is also useful on many other fruit trees and some ornamentals. It is useful for for “scab” on apples, “brown spot” on apricots, “fireblight” on pears and find more uses noted on the directions on the container. It needs be done three times during the dormant season, late November (Thanksgiving), late December (Christmas) and mid February (Valentine’s Day). It need not be done on the specific days mentioned, they are just reminders which may be easier to remember than dates are. The leaves should all have fallen before spraying. If that has not happened and there are just a few leaves left, they can usually be knocked off with a stick. If there are lots of leaves left postpone the spraying. Occasionally the first spraying is missed due to a warm fall season in which the leaves are late to fall. The whole tree should be sprayed until it drips for best coverage. It should be done on a day that will allow the spray to dry. Don’t spray on a day with especially heavy fog that we sometimes have in the winter months. The product we use on our demonstration orchard is Liqui-Cop by Monterey.

All litter should be cleared from the base of trees and plants since spores from fungal diseases are easily spread to other plants by the wind. If basins were created around trees and large shrubs during the hot summer to help keep them from becoming too dry, they should have a notch cut in the side to allow the water to drain during the wet season. Root rot can become a problem if plants are left in constantly soggy soil all winter.

Trying to anticipate what the weather is going to do this year seems like a guessing game considering all of the terrible flooding and destruction that came along with it iin many parts of our country, , though I was impressed with the accuracy with which much of it was predicted. Hopefully we will have a usual fall season on which we can base the things that can be done, though as usual, we have a fairly narrow window of time to accomplish them. Bulbs can still be planted even though you will probably have shorter stems than usual, and the following year they should be more normal. A lawn can be planted but should have annual rye planted with it. The rye grass grows quickly will create a cover crop that will protect the slower growing lawn grass should the weather become very cold. Annual rye can also be planted in an area that would benefit with some erosion control. Annual rye is a cool weather grass that grows for one season only, and then dies back adding nutrients to the soil as it decomposes. Some might possibly come up the following season if it had to seed. We also have an erosion control mix with annual rye plus two types of clover which could stay permanently if maintained – pink clover and crimson clover. Ground covers can be done successfully if planted from flats early in the fall season while there is still some warmth in the soil. The same thing applies to planting the winter annuals. As was mentioned last month, it should be done soon. They will survive the cold weather, even if planted later, but they are not likely to gain nearly enough size to give you as much color as you hoped for until spring. Trees can still be planted of course, and the sooner the better since soil will be cooling quickly along with the weather. Even in the colder soil they will continue to slowly spread roots and be ahead of any trees you might plant next spring.

Winter vegetable gardens should be in by now and could probably benefit from some fertilizer as would newly planted annuals. Any basins that were created around trees to help hold water for irrigating trees during the summer should be cut open on a side to allow them to drain to avoid root rot – they don’t need much water when there are no leaves to use it. Automatic watering systems should be adjusted to the needs of your yard or turned off if our winter is wet. Sweet peas, (and all peas) being cool weather plants, should be planted now. Because pea seeds are rather large, they can be soaked overnight just before planting them to help them sprout more quickly.

Bare root season gets underway in November when start getting bare root berry vines, asparagus roots, blueberries, rhubarb, artichokes, and other interesting things. Roses and trees come later. There is plenty enough to keep a gardener busy if one wants to be!

Cecilia Rice is a partner with her son Jeff at Bald Mountain Nursery on Bald Mountain Road in Browns Valley

We are the “Unexpected Nursery on a little country road”

Tel. (530) 743-4856 www.baldmountainnursery.com

yuba county pet of the week  11 1 17This weeks “Featured Pet” at Yuba County Animal Care Services is a brown and black Boxer, approximately three years old, called GOOFY - ID#A168391,. Goofy is neutered and will be current on his vaccinations, including rabies, which are all included in his adoption fee. You can also have him micro-chipped for $15.00 at the time of his adoption. Stop by and see this amazing guy! Yuba County Animal Care Services located at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst. 530-741-6478. Kennels are open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2 pm. You can also go to ww.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com to see all of our adoptable animals and look for your lost family pets, or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.
We will be at Petco in Yuba City this Saturday November4th, from 10-2. Stop by and check out our available furry friends looking for new homes.

yuba county pet of the week  10 16 17It’s that time of year for Autumn to come into our lives. Would you like to have Autumn year-round? Well, Yuba County Animal Care Services can arrange that for you in the form of a cute female Chihuahua puppy we call Autumn (ID#A167996)! This adorable girl is two months old and is as sweet as they come. So if you would like to enjoy Autumn all year long, come by and get swept away by this adorable pup. Yuba County Animal Care Services is located at– 5245 Feather River Blvd., Oliverhurst, 530-741-6478. Our kennel hours are Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2pm. You can also see them online at www.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.

pet of the week  10 11  17This week Yuba County Animal Care Services would like you to meet our featured pet “Tiki” (A166116), a two year old Lab mix. This is a beautiful dog with a wonderful personality. Tiki is very quiet, loves to go on walks, and loves children. Tiki was brought to us because her former family wasn’t able to give her the time and attention she needs. Tike is a sweet gentle girl who needs a home to call her own, could that home be yours! This girl is ready to go home today; she is up-to-date on her shots and already spayed. Yuba County Animal Care Services is open Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturday 10am – 2pm. Our shelter is located at 5245 Feather River Blvd. in Olivehurst, 530-741-6478. You can also see our adoptable pets online at www.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.

 BY CECILIA Rice

Welcome to October. It is usually a nice month bringing cooler weather giving us welcome hints that fall is pushing summer into the background. Changing seasons that are noticeable certainly make the weather more interesting. October is one of the most enjoyable months for me. All of the fall color that begins creeping into the landscape is a pleasure to see. October can be a very busy month for a gardener and is the best time of the year to plant trees. The soil retains the heat from the long hot summer on into the winter months, the air begins to cool, top growth slows, and deciduous plants lose their leaves as they go dormant. The roots, however will continue to expand in the warm soil and slow their growth as the soil cools with the winter temperatures. Not having to support the top growth of leaves, the roots will continue to grow slowly through those winter months making them almost a year ahead of a tree planted in the spring that has to support root growth as well as top growth while becoming established.

Considering that October has warmer soil, but cooling temperature as we go into the cold winter months, it is quite obvious that many things can be planted and thrive, but the planting should be done early enough that they can become established before the very cold weather comes along. Even the cool weather plants that are not fairly well established before encountering very cold temperatures might be stunted by those cold temperatures. They withstand the very cold temperatures but may not develop and flourish until the warmer spring temperatures. All of the color and pretty foliage could have been enjoyed all winter long by earlier planting. This same message applies to other things as well, such as a winter vegetable garden, and ground covers. They do best with this early warm soil to help them become established. Plant root vegetables such as beets, turnips, carrots and radishes from seed now. Edible peas are cool weather plants, as well as sweet peas that bloom with the lovely fragrant flowers in early spring, and they all can be planted now. If you are planning a winter vegetable garden, it is time to get it done. I know some folks were anxious and have their gardens all planted by now.

The best time to plant California native plants is in the fall when they are going dormant. They then become established naturally by Mother Nature during the cooling of the warm soil. They can be more difficult to get started in the spring since most of them are quite drought tolerant and they are easily ruined by over watering them as the weather gets hotter. Let them become established naturally, and then water them being careful not to drown them during the summer months. It’s much easier to let Mother Nature get them started.

This is the time to plant other things. Bulbs are available now, or soon will be. Get them planted for the beautiful variety and color they add to the yard. They are a bit of work to plant, but they may repeat year after year. Gophers can be a problem since they like some of them. Narcissus and daffodils are in the same family and they are safe from the gophers and can naturalize in your yard. Iris are also safe from gophers. Wildflower seeds should be scattered anytime now. Because some of the seeds are very small, it is a good idea to mix them thoroughly with some sand or other medium to add some bulk to make them scatter more evenly, and also to cover a wider area. In September it was suggested that fertilizing should be done, but it was so hot that it was hard to find just the right time. It can still be done if you weren’t able to do it. Realize that trees with fall coloring or falling leaves probably won’t utilize it well, but all the trees with green leaves and green shrubs will be fine.

It is hard to know what is ahead with the weather, but don’t stop watering with the first sign of rain. The soil is very dry with such a hot summer and it will take significant rainfall to moisten it down several feet to sustain vegetation without supplemental irrigation.

Looking forward to November, we start getting the bare root edibles such as asparagus, berries, rhubarb,

Artichokes, onions, and garlic. The transition into to fall is a such a pleasant time of the year!

Cecilia rice is a partner with her son, Jeff Rice at Baldl Mountain Nursery on Bald Mountain Road in Browns Valley.

We are “The unexpected nursery on a little country road”. www.baldmountainnursery.com

Tel. (530) 743-4856

Yuba County Pet of the Week Boarder Collie Puppy 10 4 17Check out this little guy, who is a ten week old Border Collie mix. His ID # is A167697. Stop by and visit with us at Petco in Yuba City, this Saturday October 7th from 10-2. Our shelter hours are Monday – Friday 10am – 3:30pm and Saturdays 10am – 2pm, at 5245 Feather River Blvd., Olivehurst, 530-741-6478. You can also see our adoptable pets online at www.petharbor.com or www.petfinder.com or check out our Facebook page, Yuba County Animal Care Services@yubacountyACS.

pet cooper 8 30 17ID#A166879 “Copper” This week we would like you to meet Copper. He is a Neutered male, he is a white and brownish Border Collie. He is about 8 years old but still has tons of life left. He is really playful and great with human interaction. He knows a few commands, and did we mention he is already neutered?! Copper would do best if he was in a cat free home. He has been here with us at YCACS since Aug 14, 2017, please help us find this guy his furever home.

Adoption fee is just $60 and includes vaccines and spay. Add on a microchip for $15 more! If you are interested in adopting Copper, please call or come by the shelter. 5245 Feather River Blvd Olivehurst. 530-741-6478 We are open Monday-Friday 8:30am-3:30pm, Saturday 10am-2pm. For lost and adoptable animals, check out www.petharbor.com. We are always accepting new volunteers and donations.

 by Cecilia Rice

It is already September and that means we are on the path to fall which usually brings with it some cooling temperatures and definitely shorter days. Summer frequently doesn’t give up easily and we usually have some hot days to cope with. There are definitely things to be done in the garden. Watering and keeping weeds at bay seems to be ever present by this time of the year, but will begin to slack off. A winter vegetable garden means it is time to take out the plants that have been producing all summer. I know that is a tough thing to make yourself do since many plants are still producing. Unless there is another garden plot to be used, clearing the present spot is just about the only choice. Start with the plants that are obviously showing signs of slowing production and go from there – tomatoes are usually what we have to give up last. Where ever the new winter garden is to go, the soil needs to be worked up and readied. The winter veggies will begin to be available soon, and are already available in many places. They will do better if they are planted in cooler weather than we have been experiencing this summer. We get requests for winter vegetables in the heat of August, but we usually wait until the second week of September to offer them.

September is an important month for fertilizing trees and shrubs. They store nutrients within the trunks and limbs to carry them through the winter, and help them leaf out, bloom and set fruit in the coming spring season. This has to be done while there are still healthy green and working leaves on them. There is no specific time for the leaves to start showing the fall color change, but we all know it is in fall. Keep an eye on them and don’t miss the opportunity to get the fertilizing done. It will benefit your shrubs and trees. As usual, there are exceptions – any plant that has already set buds for spring bloom, such as rhododendrons and camellias should not be fertilized now, do them soon after they finish their bloom cycle. The reason being that they will likely respond to the fertilizer and start putting on new growth which can push the buds off the plant. Just wait until they have finished their bloom cycle to fertilize them. That is when they normally start putting on new growth and the fertilizer is very beneficial for that process.

Since September ushers in fall, it is a month that allows us to do things that would have been difficult in the heat of the summer. Of course, I am assuming that we will have fairly normal fall weather. Number one, you can plant a lawn. As the temperatures trend down and we no longer have the scorching heat we had earlier, it is much easier to keep the newly emerging grass damp enough so that it doesn’t perish. Speaking of lawns, this is the proper time to apply fertilizer with pre-emergent to kill and prevent crabgrass. Number two, ground covers from flats can also be planted and established since it is so much easier to keep the area damp allowing roots and runners find their way and multiply, Number three, It is a good time to dig up some perennials and divide them to enlarge a bed, create a new bed, or share them with other gardeners. This is routine for many garden clubs at this time of the year. Number four, this is the time to start thinking about any trees or large shrubs that you might want to plant this fall. They will slowly develop roots during the winter giving them an advantage over the same thing planted next spring. I know that choosing a tree going dormant is not as intriguing as picking out a tree leafing out with fresh foliage in the lovely spring weather. But, the fall planted tree will leaf out next spring in your yard. October is the best month for tree planting, so start thinking about the trees you would consider. Pick out your tree or plant, take it home in the container, put it in a place that can’t be missed and water it well daily, and plant it in the cooling weather of October when transplant shock is not as likely.

The soil is still warm in September, so it is an ideal time to plant winter annuals if you are interested in some colorful plants in the yard throughout the winter. Plant them soon into the still warm soil as opposed to the cold soil which can stunt them – they will grow, but probably not flourish until warmer spring weather comes. Enjoy the color all winter by starting them soon. Consider pansies, violas, primroses, snapdragons, calendulas, cyclamen and dianthus. Bulbs will be available in many places soon. Plant now for spring bloom. If you have a gopher problem, choose daffodils and narcissus, they will not bother them except to sometimes move them around a bit. Fall is also the time to plant wildflower seeds. When shopping for them check the container carefully. Pure wildflower seed is a bit expensive and often it looks as if it is a bargain until you check the contents of the package and find a large percentage is grass seed. Because many of the wildflower seeds are very small it is a good idea to mix them with some sand or something else to give them bulk so that they can be spread more evenly over a larger area.

Using pre-emergent now will help to reduce the growth of winter weeds, keeping in mind that it will keep any good seeds you may have planted from sprouting as well, so be careful with it. Remember that all those leaves that will be falling soon make great compost. If you have a compost pile add them. If you don’t, you might want to find space to start one – it is great to have it always available, especially in the summer. Enjoy the coming seasonal changes.

Cecilia Rice is a partner with her son Jeff at Bald Mountain Nursery on Bald Mountain Road in Browns Valley. We are “The unexpected nursery on a little country road” Tel (530) 743-4856 www.baldmountainnursery.com